Wednesday, May 5, 2021
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with writer Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor about the racist real estate practices that ensured wealth accumulated along racial lines, even after housing discrimination became illegal.
Wednesday, May 5, 2021
As the United States continues to reckon with its history of systemic racism and police brutality, Eddie S. Glaude Jr. guides us through the meaning and purpose of James Baldwin's work and how his words can help us navigate the current moment.
Monday, May 3, 2021
From a leading prison abolitionist, a moving memoir about coming of age in Brooklyn and surviving incarceration.
Monday, May 3, 2021
Newly available in paperback, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership uncovers how exploitative real estate practices continued well after housing discrimination was banned.
Monday, Apr 26, 2021
This hour, we discuss what the verdict means for the Black community, and if the decision could signal change in policing and racial disparities in the criminal justice system.
Monday, Apr 26, 2021
Naomi talks with us about her J-A roots in Oakland, how her dad’s career in the criminal-legal system got her thinking about carceral politics, why police reform has long been a trap, and the history of hate crimes legislation in the US. She shares her observations on Black Lives Matter, the emergence of abolitionist thinking, and the discourse...
Monday, Apr 26, 2021
Building upon the historical legacy and impactful work of Princeton’s Women*s Center and LGBT Center, a new center for gender and sexuality at Princeton University will launch in fall 2021, allowing staff to better serve individuals and groups across campus, said LaTanya Buck, dean for diversity and inclusion in the Office of the Vice President...
Friday, Apr 23, 2021
Princeton faculty members Mitchell Duneier, J. Nicole Shelton, Keith Wailoo, Nieng Yan and Deborah Yashar, as well as Presidential Visiting Scholar in the Lewis Center for the Arts Hilton Als of The New Yorker have been elected to the Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Wednesday, Apr 21, 2021
When Judge Peter Cahill read the verdict that Derek Chauvin was guilty on all three counts for the murder of George Floyd I imagined ghosts dancing around the courtroom. They leapt from chair to chair. Shouting, laughing, and crying all at once. They were the dead who haunted this trial—Black people, across generations, who died by the hands of...
Wednesday, Apr 21, 2021
Imani Perry, professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, says during the course of U.S. history, Americans have been in this situation many times before, witnessing excessive violence against Black, Brown and poor people with little to no action toward real change or reform.
Wednesday, Apr 21, 2021
Eddie Glaude, professor of African American studies at Princeton University and MSNBC contributor, joins us to discuss one of the highest-profile trials in recent memory.
Tuesday, Apr 20, 2021
Our second episode looks at the culture and politics of Black foodways, from the ways in which Black women have used food to create traditions and claim power to the contemporary politics of nutrition, stereotypes, and food shaming. Beyond the platitude that food unites us all, Ebun Ajayi and Mélena Laudig explore the diversity of ways in which...
Monday, Apr 19, 2021
Prof. Imani Perry explains what she believes needs to happen in order to reform the policing in America. She and Mehdi discuss why the Chauvin trial is a "powder keg," and why more societal work will have to follow regardless of the verdict.
Monday, Apr 19, 2021
After a second-degree manslaughter charge was announced for the police officer who shot and killed Daunte Wright, Professor Eddie Glaude joins Zerlina Maxwell to discuss the long history of police violence against Black Americans.
Friday, Apr 16, 2021
184 artists, writers, scholars and scientists were awarded Fellowships. Professor Imani Perry was awarded a fellowship for Intellectual & Cultural History, while Professor Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor was awarded for United States History.
Monday, Apr 12, 2021
The rise of artificial intelligence (AI) promised the elimination of errors of human prejudice. Yet while conducting research on facial recognition technologies, computer scientist Joy Buolamwini uncovered that some algorithms could not detect her Black face until she put on a white mask.
Monday, Apr 12, 2021
In One Drop, Blay questions conventional perceptions of Blackness in order to create and understand a more diverse worldwide community.
Monday, Apr 12, 2021
The Graduate School Teaching Awards honor those graduate students who have made a significant contribution to undergraduate teaching. Students are nominated each spring by academic departments and programs. Winners are selected by a committee chaired by Cole Crittenden, deputy dean of the Graduate School, and comprising the academic affairs deans...
Monday, Apr 12, 2021
by Department of African American Studies
The Department of African American Studies stands in solidarity with the Asian American community. The horrific violence in Atlanta and across the country reveal the depth of hatred and resentment that threaten to overwhelm this country... [ Read Full Statement]
Friday, Apr 9, 2021
Prairie View A&M University President Ruth J. Simmons, who previously served as president of both Brown University and Smith College, will deliver the keynote address at Princeton University’s 2021 Baccalaureate ceremony. Simmons was selected by the Committee on Honorary Degrees, which includes University trustees, faculty members and students...
Friday, Apr 9, 2021
Maria and Julio talk with ITT All-Stars Renée Graham, a columnist for The Boston Globe, and Dr. Eddie Glaude Jr., James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor at Princeton University, about the murder trial for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin.
Friday, Apr 9, 2021
This event brought together two contemporary artists, Annalee Davis and Julie Gough, in conversation with Dr. Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Assistant Professor of African American Studies and Art & Archaeology at Princeton University, for a discussion on how their artistic practices are invested in exploring and highlighting the medical and...
Friday, Apr 9, 2021
Do President Biden's stimulus and infrastructure bills represent a moment of political expedience, or a more permanent change?
Monday, Apr 5, 2021
Glad You Asked host Joss Fong wants to know: Why do we think tech is neutral? How do algorithms become biased? And how can we fix these algorithms before they cause harm?
Monday, Mar 29, 2021
From the New York Times bestselling author of Stony the Road and one of our most important voices on the African American experience comes The Black Church: This Is Our Story, This Is Our Song, a powerful new history of the Black church as a foundation of Black life and a driving force in the larger freedom struggle in America.
Friday, Mar 26, 2021
By peeling back the curtain to show viewers the reality behind the mythology of the royal family, Markle’s story was a powerful indictment of the ways misogyny, racism, and their intersections affect Black women.
Thursday, Mar 25, 2021
In the wake of Covid-19 and uprisings in response to a climate of anti-blackness, join us for a conversation about time, temporality, and Black life: how time is racialized, how race is temporalized and how time is wielded as a tool of racialized violence. Why are some able to use time, while others are largely used and abused by it? Why is it...
Monday, Mar 22, 2021
I am grateful for the four essays in response to Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership and the insights they bring to the many different policy and historical narratives in the book. In doing so, they collectively point our attention to the persistence of housing insecurity and inequality in the...
Monday, Mar 22, 2021
To avoid replicating this awful moment, our failures must become the source of our children’s political possibilities.
Friday, Mar 19, 2021
On Thursday, April 30th, Black Women Radicals partnered with the Asian-American Feminist Collective (AAFC) on the Instagram Live event, "Sisters and Siblings in the Struggle: COVID-19 and Black and Asian-American Feminist Solidarities."
Wednesday, Mar 10, 2021
Laini (Sylvia) Abernathy (who died in 2010) was an artist, designer, and activist. Cooper Hewitt is collecting album covers designed by this important designer, who contributed to the Black cultural scene in the late 1960s.
Wednesday, Mar 10, 2021
If you're fairly new to this topic, it can feel overwhelming—so here are some podcasts, books, and documentaries to start with
Wednesday, Mar 10, 2021
Students, professors, and education experts worry that that’s pushing Black students in particular out of math and science
Wednesday, Mar 10, 2021
Plenty of people use Google Sheets for data curation; what would it look like to use Google Sheets as a lightweight relational database? For the Princeton Ethiopian Miracles of Mary (PEMM) project, led by Wendy Laura Belcher, we had a chance to experiment with this.
Monday, Mar 1, 2021
On episode 165 of The Quarantine Tapes, guest host Imani Perry is joined by Sanford Biggers. Sanford is an artist working across a wide range of disciplines. He talks with Imani about some of his recent work with quilting, describing how he came to that medium and talking about the cultural and historical elements of that work.
Monday, Mar 1, 2021
Guest host Imani Perry is joined by Esther Choo on episode 164 of The Quarantine Tapes. As an emergency physician, Esther lends her perspective on this moment, from the early days of the crisis to the inequities in the pandemic response to the distribution of the vaccine.
Friday, Feb 26, 2021
Stowe Prize 2021, honoring Dr. Eddie Glaude, for his book, Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own.
Friday, Feb 26, 2021
Princeton Professor Imani Perry—a prolific scholar of African American Studies whose biography of Lorraine Hansberry, Looking For Lorraine, won the 2019 PEN Biography Prize—recommends five books she considers essential to an understanding of the history of black life in America.
Friday, Feb 26, 2021
Arguably, no writer has ever made that demand more forcefully, passionately, or eloquently than James Baldwin. More than 33 years since his death at age 63, Baldwin continues to give voice to our times.
Friday, Feb 26, 2021
On episode 163 of The Quarantine Tapes, guest host Imani Perry is joined by Alicia Hall Moran for a two-part episode. Imani and Alicia have a fascinating and wide-reaching conversation about Alicia’s work as an artist and vocalist.
Friday, Feb 26, 2021
This Black History Month, explore the stories of Black Princetonians across generations. Below, find a sampling of these experiences, from the University’s founding through the present. These are stories of resilience, resistance, and everything in between.
Tags:  History
Thursday, Feb 25, 2021
In the wake of Covid-19 and uprisings in response to a climate of anti-blackness, join us for a conversation about time, temporality, and Black life: how time is racialized, how race is temporalized and how time is wielded as a tool of racialized violence. Why are some able to use time, while others are largely used and abused by it? Why is it...
Monday, Feb 22, 2021
The ‘white problem’ ... Baldwin’s writings spark a timely and absorbing engagement with American history
Monday, Feb 22, 2021
When Ruha Benjamin was 14, she moved from South Carolina to the South Pacific with her parents, educators tasked with curriculum development and teacher training in Majuro, the capital of the Marshall Islands. To keep the family entertained, her father brought boxes of VHS tapes filled with “Star Trek” episodes.
Friday, Feb 19, 2021
In our inaugural new episode, Ebun and Mae take a deep dive into questions about the impact of COVID-19 on communities of color. From cultural responses to lockdown and the need for a government response to creating a more just and inclusive public health system, our host break down multiple dimensions of the pandemic and point toward some...
Tags:  AAS Podcast
Wednesday, Feb 17, 2021
Black history is a part of all our histories. In recognition of Black History Month, Princeton University will host virtual conversations, classes, exhibits and educational resources that recognize the lives and achievements of Black people in the context of Princeton’s and the country’s history.
Friday, Feb 12, 2021
The rush to get back to normal is coming into conflict with many teachers, who want vaccines and airtight mitigation protocols before agreeing to return to schools. “Most parents of Black and Latinx students share their concerns,” Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes.
Friday, Feb 12, 2021
In this episode, Laura spends the full half-hour in conversation with Professor Glaude about his book, Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own.
Friday, Feb 12, 2021
For this special Black History Month episode, CNN’s Don Lemon speaks with Rep. James Clyburn, historian Prof. Imani Perry, and Howard University choir conductor Eric Poole about the song’s history, cultural significance, and impressive staying power over the past century. And how it’s now more relevant than ever. 
Friday, Feb 12, 2021
In a new book, Alicia Garza writes, “We can’t be afraid to establish a base that is larger than the people we feel comfortable with.”
Friday, Feb 12, 2021
Lagunju reminds us that time fades, blurs, and wounds the world, but we can create new magic with what remains.
Friday, Feb 12, 2021
An Interview with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Monday, Feb 8, 2021
Every year for a month, we celebrate the heroes of Black history. But these stories can obscure how change happens and who gets left behind.
Monday, Feb 8, 2021
Panther Piss was much more than just a beverage for these revolutionaries; it was a recipe for change.
Tags:  History
Friday, Jan 29, 2021
What is it like to pore over — and even touch — the handwriting of a world-renowned author on the lined notepaper on which she drafted her famous novels? What do you learn about the writing process from reading an author’s handwritten pen and pencil scribbles as she made changes to early drafts of work on typewritten pages? And what happens when...
Friday, Jan 29, 2021
Princeton seniors Jimin Kang and Aisha Tahir, and University of Oxford student Hannah Duffus have been named recipients of the Daniel M. Sachs Class of 1960 Graduating Scholarship, one of Princeton University’s highest awards.
Monday, Jan 25, 2021
Punishment can radicalize and further alienate people, while social policy and grassroots community building can defuse potential violence.
Friday, Jan 15, 2021
The iconic American author, essayist, poet and playwright turned his life’s struggles into brilliant literary works, as relevant today as when they were written. Here’s a guide to his best books to start with, by the author of Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Today.
Friday, Jan 15, 2021
We look at the fight for accountability after a white supremacist mob attacked the U.S. Capitol and as President Trump is impeached for a historic second time for his incitement of violence.
Wednesday, Jan 13, 2021
Broken though it may be, America is ours, and together we can make this place anew, if we are finally honest with ourselves about the ugliness that has the country by the throat again.
Wednesday, Jan 13, 2021
The events of January 6th make clear a growing unity between the Republican Party and white supremacists.
Wednesday, Jan 13, 2021
The great writer’s passion and resilience resonate anew in Eddie S Glaude Jr’s timely, powerful study
Wednesday, Jan 13, 2021
It is not unreasonable for Black communities to have questions about the vaccine or about the safety of schools, Keeanga-Yamahttta Taylor writes: “it should be expected given the long history and contemporary expression of racism and inequality in this country.”
Wednesday, Jan 13, 2021
NPR's Steve Inkseep King talks to Eddie Glaude, chair of Princeton University's department of African American Studies, about the response to the Capitol breach and that of racial justice protests.
Wednesday, Jan 13, 2021
NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, an assistant professor in Princeton University's Department of African American Studies, about how police handled the breach of the Capitol.
Monday, Jan 11, 2021
In a special extended interview, listen to Ruha Benjamin and Deborah Raji discuss practical steps for developing artificial intelligence technologies in a way that leads to more equity and equal justice—whether it’s tech companies being ready to slow down, or government standards that take racial justice into account.
Monday, Jan 11, 2021
2020 has been a year unlike any within living memory, and one that exposed some of America's deepest divides. Judy Woodruff spoke with emergency medical physician Dr. Uche Blackstock, Eddie Glaude, of Princeton University, New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore, and Yuval Levin, editor of National Affairs magazine, to discuss the pandemic, America's...
Monday, Jan 11, 2021
This month, as we celebrate the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., we look to his role as a leading figure in the African American church. MLK’s important work inspires us to explore the history, complexity, and influences of Black religion in American life. Browse the eBooks below to find studies on Black women’s Christian activism, the...
Monday, Jan 11, 2021
On episode 147 of The Quarantine Tapes, guest host Eddie Glaude is joined by Reverend William Barber. Eddie and Williams have a stirring conversation about how this moment of death and grief fits into a long history of acceptable deaths in the United States.
Monday, Jan 11, 2021
Guest host Eddie Glaude is joined by writer Kiese Laymon on episode 146 of The Quarantine Tapes. They connect over their shared background as writers from Mississippi and Eddie asks Kiese about his worries prior to the release of his recent memoir.
Wednesday, Jan 6, 2021
In Princeton’s 2020 Discovery magazine, Judith Weisenfeld, the Agate Brown and George L. Collord Professor of Religion and chair of the Department of Religion, explains how psychiatry was used to subjugate Blacks following Emancipation.
Wednesday, Dec 23, 2020

Join us in solidarity with Garrett Felber for a discussion about defending anti-racist and abolitionist organizing in academia.

Wednesday, Dec 23, 2020
Guest host Eddie Glaude is joined by poet Natasha Trethewey on episode 145 of The Quarantine Tapes. Natasha’s most recent book is her memoir, Memorial Drive. In their conversation, Eddie asks her about the process of writing and releasing that book into this moment of political and social reckoning.
Wednesday, Dec 23, 2020
On episode 144 of The Quarantine Tapes, guest host Eddie Glaude is joined by writer Sarah Broom. Eddie and Sarah’s conversation dives deep into the craft and practice of writing. Sarah reflects on the time she is spending with visual art lately and the influence of painting and color theory on how she thinks about writing.
Monday, Dec 21, 2020
Ruha Benjamin exposes the injustice behind the numbers
Monday, Dec 21, 2020
This week, we’re bringing you a selection of pieces about the evolution of Black Lives Matter and the racial-justice movement in America.
Friday, Dec 18, 2020
Listen, a lot has happened this year, and it's no shock that some things may have slipped under the radar. So our resident book expert, Karen Grigsby Bates, took a virtual trip around the country to talk to independent book store owners about their favorite underappreciated reads of 2020.
Friday, Dec 18, 2020
Professor Wallace D. Best was appointed director of the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies
Friday, Dec 18, 2020
HAI faculty members share their favorite fiction and nonfiction books with a technology theme.
Friday, Dec 18, 2020
Elaborating on the entanglements between the past and present of US politics, Eddie S.  Glaude Jr.’s Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own effectively interweaves Baldwin’s time with our own.
Friday, Dec 18, 2020
Princeton’s Forward Fest — a virtual public conversation series and a monthly highlight of the University’s yearlong A Year of Forward Thinking community engagement campaign — continues Thursday, Dec. 17, with a deep-dive into the arts and humanities.
Friday, Dec 18, 2020
Princeton senior Kiara “KiKi” Gilbert has been named a 2021 Marshall Scholar. The Marshall Scholarship seeks to promote strong relations between the United Kingdom and the United States by offering intellectually distinguished young Americans the opportunity to develop their abilities as future leaders. The scholarship covers the cost of two years...
Friday, Dec 18, 2020
Equating conversation with political action
Friday, Dec 18, 2020

This multi-part programme of research events focuses on the encounter between artistic and art-historical practice and the forces of the natural world. It places such encounters in both contemporary and historical perspectives. 

Wednesday, Dec 16, 2020
She was known for her fiery rhetoric and anarchist beliefs, but labor activist Lucy Parsons wasn’t exactly who she claimed to be.
Wednesday, Dec 16, 2020
Improving health care, especially for the disadvantaged, has long been the focus of Brent L. Henry ’69’s career. From the corporate world to the practice of law, he’s found the best approach to tackling challenges is to encourage idea-sharing and team strategizing.
Tuesday, Dec 8, 2020
Wallace Best and Stacy Wolf talk about the power of musical theatre and her new book Beyond Broadway: The Pleasure and Promise of Musical Theatre Across America.
Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020
Five members of the Princeton faculty have been named to endowed professorships, effective Dec. 1.
Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020
Princeton University’s Board of Trustees has approved the following faculty promotions, effective Jan. 16, 2021.
Monday, Nov 23, 2020
World-renowned writer and Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, the Robert F. Goheen Professor in the Humanities, Emeritus, at Princeton University, who died on Aug. 5, 2019, will be honored in a Thanksgiving weekend marathon reading of her novel “Song of Solomon” and a posthumous induction into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.
Monday, Nov 23, 2020
Family members of death row prisoner Rodney Reed, Rodrick and Sandra Reed, police torture victim and former juvenile life without parole prisoner Mark Clements, author and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, and journalist Liliana Segura discuss fighting racism in the criminal “injustice” system.
Monday, Nov 23, 2020
Harvard Book Store's virtual event series welcomes acclaimed poet Dr. Joshua Bennett—the Mellon Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College and author of The Sobbing School: Poems—for a discussion of his latest books, Being Property Once Myself: Blackness and the End of Man and the poetry collection Owed. He will be...
Monday, Nov 23, 2020
Join Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., Hilton Als, and Imani Perry for a virtual discussion of James Baldwin’s No Name in the Street. Moderated by Julian Lucas.
Monday, Nov 23, 2020
Black voters had Biden’s back this election and he says he’ll have theirs. Can he keep his promise?
Monday, Nov 23, 2020
What difference will Kamala Harris actually make when she takes office? From justice reform to immigration, 25 experts lay out the concrete impact a pioneering vice president could have.
Wednesday, Nov 11, 2020
From the The Quarantine Tapes Podcast with Paul Holdengräber
Monday, Nov 9, 2020

Like tens of millions of Americans, I voted to end the miserable reign of Donald J. Trump, but we cannot perpetuate the election-year fiction that the deep and bewildering problems facing millions of people in this country will simply end with the Trump Administration.

Friday, Oct 30, 2020
Wallace D. Best, a professor of religion and African American Studies, was appointed director of the Gender and Sexuality Studies (GSS) program last month. Best is the first Black and the first male director of the program in its 38-year history. 
Monday, Oct 26, 2020
Far from loosening incarceration’s grip, modern tools like predictive policing and tracking apps have instead deepened the carceral state’s influence over everyday life.
Monday, Oct 26, 2020
Decades of reform have built an agile, deadly force that pushes millions of people into the largest carceral system in the world.
Wednesday, Oct 21, 2020
Photographs at the intersection of race, gender, and work
Wednesday, Oct 21, 2020

The above segment is from The Matter of Fact Listening Tour hosted by Soledad O’Brien.

Wednesday, Oct 21, 2020

Reading is just one aspect of allyship, and it certainly is not the final step. Use these resources for good. Discuss them with others. Share them. Listen to your black friends, black co-workers, and black peers. Take action. Donate. Take an AAS class. Send emails. Have difficult conversations. Protest.

Friday, Oct 16, 2020
Mellody Hobson and the Hobson/Lucas Family Foundation have made the lead gift to establish a new residential college at Princeton University. Hobson College will be the first residential college at Princeton named for a Black woman and will be built on the site of First College, formerly known as Wilson College.
Wednesday, Oct 14, 2020
Part 1: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor: We Must Rethink Our Society, from Policing to the Supreme Court
Thursday, Oct 1, 2020
Gender and sexuality studies are ideally positioned to help us to understand the complex world we face, says Wallace Best, professor of religion and African American studies, who was recently appointed director of Princeton University’s Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies (GSS).
Wednesday, Sep 30, 2020
Boseman's influence extended beyond the industry. Through all of his movies he inspired moviegoers around the world, challenging preconceived ideas about who we could be. The countless stories of Black children elated by seeing Black Panther on screen reflect the power and potential of cinema. Boseman represented that power and that potential.
Monday, Sep 28, 2020
A group of about 25 experts announced Friday that they have formed a group to analyze and critique Facebook's content moderation decisions.
Friday, Sep 25, 2020
Why should the Supreme Court, an unelected body that is richer, whiter, and more male than the United States is, continue to have such outsized power in the lives of ordinary people?
Friday, Sep 25, 2020
The violent theft of thousands of works of African art by mostly-Western powers is well-documented—but the pieces remain in the collections of Western museums. Is it time to return Africa's looted art? And how should that process play out?
Monday, Sep 21, 2020
On this episode, the meaning and purpose of James Baldwin's work and how his words can help us navigate the current moment.
Wednesday, Sep 16, 2020
Ruha Benjamin, associate professor of African American studies at Princeton University, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, assistant professor of African American studies, have been named among the first cohort of Freedom Scholars, an initiative supporting progressive academics who are at the forefront of movements for economic and social justice.
Wednesday, Sep 16, 2020
We look back on the life and work of the great American writer and thinker James Baldwin.
Wednesday, Sep 16, 2020
It would be easy to underestimate the significance of the actions taken by these athletes because of their wealth and celebrity. But it is simply incredible that many players, for some during the playoffs for their various leagues, have violated their contracts, withdrawn their labor, and demanded that this country change.
Friday, Sep 11, 2020
Princeton University professor Ruha Benjamin joins Adam to reveal the issues at play at the intersection of technology and race, her concept of the “New Jim Code”, digital redlining and and how the technology can’t be relied on to solve what are ultimately social problems.
Friday, Sep 11, 2020
Minister, activist, and Princeton University scholar Nyle Fort discusses reimagining a post-pandemic America.
Friday, Sep 4, 2020
Continuing work to address racism includes scholarly and operational initiatives across the University
Friday, Sep 4, 2020
Last week, over 140 students and community members attended a virtual book talk with University professors Imani Perry and Eddie S. Glaude, Jr. GS ’97.
Friday, Sep 4, 2020
We are living with the current forms of the lasting regime of American imperialism on which this nation was founded. Understanding and teaching this mitigates against narratives of US exceptionalism that declare America is not imperialist and that are therefore useless for challenging or imagining alternatives to our present. Untangling art...
Wednesday, Aug 26, 2020

Joe Biden began his speech to accept the Democratic Party’s nomination with a quote from the civil-rights radical and Black revolutionary Ella Baker: “Give people light and they will find a way.” Though Baker may have been commenting on her particular approach to organizing, Biden used the...

Wednesday, Aug 26, 2020
How federal housing programs failed Black America.
Wednesday, Aug 26, 2020
Join us for a conversation with Ruha Benjamin, Associate Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. 
Monday, Aug 24, 2020
Cuts to public services that might mitigate poverty and promote social mobility have become a perpetual excuse for more police.
Wednesday, Aug 12, 2020

Minister, activist, and Princeton University scholar Nyle Fort discusses the pursuit of economic justice as civil rights and previews his upcoming broadcast episode on The Open Mind.

Wednesday, Aug 12, 2020

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor joins Noname for a discussion about Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective as part of the Noname Book Club Free Reading Program. 

Wednesday, Aug 12, 2020
Eddie Glaude Jr. on why Baldwin thought the idea of white America was irredeemable — but the country wasn't.
Friday, Aug 7, 2020
Eddie Glaude on How Baldwin Confronted America's Most Exceptional Lie
Tuesday, Aug 4, 2020
Race After Technology is both an accessible introduction to the world of science and technology research and a thorough review of academic literature on racial inequity in the field.
Tuesday, Aug 4, 2020
The author of “Race for Profit” on how capitalism has restricted Black wealth accumulation.
Tuesday, Aug 4, 2020
In our first follow-up episode, Julie and Eve talk about book design with Dr. Kinohi Nishikawa, an associate professor of English and African American Studies at Princeton University and a specialist in 20th century African American literature, book history, and pop culture. They discuss how Black authors and editors have used book design to...
Tuesday, Aug 4, 2020
Like police violence against people of color, this isn’t a new issue. Activists and scholars like Angela Davis and Ruth Wilson Gilmore have been arguing for the abolition of prisons for decades. But if you want to further educate yourself, we asked 11 scholars, lawyers, and activists what books they recommend for those seeking a deeper...
Thursday, Jul 30, 2020
Through archival research and activists’ testimony, this two-part series recounts the 2015 protest that sparked a reckoning with institutional racism at Princeton.
Thursday, Jul 30, 2020
Through archival research and activists’ testimony, this two-part series recounts the 2015 protest that sparked a reckoning with institutional racism at Princeton.
Tuesday, Jul 28, 2020
As cocreators of the #8ToAbolitioncampaign, here we expand on the invitation of abolition by responding to some typical questions posed to abolitionists and by offering some examples of the work communities are doing to create a world in which we can all be safe.
Tuesday, Jul 28, 2020
With calls for “defunding police” on the rise, invisible, tech-mediated surveillance continues to penetrate every area of our lives – workplaces, schools, hospitals, and of course policing itself. How does this relate to a longer history of surveilling Black life and how are people mobilizing against this New Jim Code?
Tuesday, Jul 28, 2020
A daughter's memoir grapples with grief and love
Tuesday, Jul 28, 2020
For Trina Swanson ’20 and her colleagues at the JUST DATA Lab, data is a means more than an end. Founded by Professor Ruha Benjamin (African American Studies), a member of the Center for Digital Humanities (CDH) Executive Board, the JUST DATA Lab aims both to analyze data within its historical and social contexts and to deploy it to advance...
Friday, Jul 24, 2020
So I'm here now to offer 10 powerful books by Black authors that deal with race in America that you can actually get your hands on.
Friday, Jul 24, 2020
In the midst of a moral reckoning, America needs a third founding.
Friday, Jul 24, 2020
Barbara Smith and the Black feminist visionaries of the Combahee River Collective.
Friday, Jul 24, 2020

In conversation with Don Cheadle. Don Cheadle is an award-winning actor, author, and activist. 

Friday, Jul 24, 2020
Six Princeton professors talk about how the books on their shelves relate to their work and share what’s on their summer reading lists. Many of their book choices reflect their scholarly research and personal perspectives on current crises related to the COVID-19 pandemic and racial injustice.
Friday, Jul 17, 2020
A recording of our panel discussion on the Black Lives Matter movement. Featuring Elizabeth Hinton, Robin D. G. Kelley, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Brandon M. Terry, and Cornel West.
Friday, Jul 17, 2020
Ruha Benjamin shares research from her book Race After Technology, as part of our Now What series.
Friday, Jul 17, 2020
It is hardly consolation to be reminded that this is not the first low point in American history. But a look back at that past does reveal that, at the very least, even the worst moments contain lessons that can still apply today. And if we listen to those lessons, perhaps a better future will be possible. With that in mind, TIME asked 21...
Friday, Jul 10, 2020
Confederate statues represent the myths and lies that underlie the persistent racism in American society. To tear down these symbols of historical oppression is to declare a new age, one in which we confront—rather than glorify—our history and confront the reality of who we are in the present. 
Friday, Jul 10, 2020

In a 2018 interview, Professor Chika Okeke-Agulu discusses France's promise of restitution of cultural works to Africa. 

Friday, Jul 10, 2020
I ask of this Independence Day: What to Black Americans is the Fourth of July?
Friday, Jul 10, 2020
The 'Begin Again' author shares titles to help contextualize this moment of racial reckoning in America.
Tuesday, Jul 7, 2020
When my thoughts turned recently to the renewed debate about the Confederate flag and its place in American life, I did what I often do in times of intellectual perplexity. I called my mother.
Wednesday, Jul 1, 2020
Police use of facial recognition is just one of the many ways policing occurs “without the flesh and blood presence of actual police,” says Ruha Benjamin.
Wednesday, Jul 1, 2020
We now face a moral reckoning: Americans have to decide whether this country will truly be a multiracial democracy or whether to merely tinker around the edges of our problems once again and remain decidedly racist and unequal.
Monday, Jun 29, 2020
University trustees concluded that Wilson’s “racist thinking and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for a school or college,” Princeton’s president said on Saturday.
Monday, Jun 29, 2020
Dr. Tera W. Hunter discusses the importance of Juneteenth.
Monday, Jun 29, 2020
For Baldwin, the past had always been bent in service of a lie. Could a true story be told?
Wednesday, Jun 24, 2020
New archival project in the history of African American education will be co-directed by HGSE's Jarvis Givens and Princeton's Imani Perry.
Wednesday, Jun 24, 2020
Perhaps writer James Baldwin best articulated the exhaustion many Black Americans feel right now. Many people are returning to his work now, in a time that feels chillingly similar to his own. We talked more about Baldwin and his thoughts on race in America with Bill Maxwell, professor of English and African American studies at the Washington...
Wednesday, Jun 24, 2020
As some politicians call for reforms in the wake of police brutality protests, residents of some cities are demanding departments be stripped of their budgets or dissolved altogether.
Monday, Jun 15, 2020
So many people taught us to be more than the hatred heaped upon us.
Monday, Jun 15, 2020
Black leaders regularly fail to rise to the challenges that confront young people.
Wednesday, Jun 10, 2020
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor and Marc Lamont Hill discuss the history, present, and future of the fight for a world where Black Lives Matter, hosted by E. Tammy Kim.
Monday, Jun 8, 2020
The quest to transform this country cannot be limited to challenging its brutal police.
Monday, Jun 8, 2020
Between the coronavirus and police killings, Black communities are coping with seemingly endless grief. The absence of funerals during the pandemic has been particularly devastating to a culture in which collective mourning plays a vital role.
Friday, Jun 5, 2020
Freedom dreams are grown and nurtured out of the hardest, barely yielding soul. Our gardens must grow. That is a metaphor and a literal truth. When the bruised and battered seek refuge from the storm, may all of us who believe in freedom remain ready to feed and sustain them.
Friday, Jun 5, 2020
Religion & Politics Editor Marie Griffith sat down with Glaude for an interview. His words are more presicent than ever today as the country confronts mass protests over the latest killings of black men and women, most famously Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd.
Friday, Jun 5, 2020
Sarah talks to Princeton professor Dr. Eddie S. Glaude Jr. about the country's response to the killing of George Floyd, the significant difference between passive and active support, and the lessons that can be learned from the #MeToo movement in the fight for racial equality.
Thursday, Jun 4, 2020
"You cannot be violent to property. You can be violent to human beings. The destruction of property cannot be deemed equivalent to the destruction of human life," says Dr. Imani Perry
Thursday, Jun 4, 2020
I suggest that one approach would be to make a distinction between listening to black living and to black life. Listening to black living means not solely listening for what the victim or perpetrator has to say, but also attending to the entire soundscape. This is a sonic terrain of sociality that is irreducible to a quote; it can’t be circulated...
Tuesday, Jun 2, 2020
by Department of African American Studies
Protests have erupted across the nation in the wake of recent police killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and the many other victims of police brutality.
Tuesday, Jun 2, 2020
As police departments face increasing criticism for using excessive force on protesters, we get response from Professor Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, renowned scholar Professor Cornel West and attorney Bakari Sellers.
Friday, May 29, 2020

Ready or not, life is returning to some sort of normal in the United States, and normal inevitably includes police officers killing an unarmed black man in their custody, followed by street protests. The country is working its way back into its familiar groove.

Friday, May 29, 2020

Spanning over 100 years, this selection of prints demonstrates not only the wide range of traditional and experimental techniques but also the pervasive current of iconic and narrative impulses that characterize the graphic work of African American artists from Henry Ossawa Tanner to Martin Puryear.

Thursday, May 28, 2020
Today on episode 44 of The Quarantine Tapes, Paul Holdengräber speaks with professor and author Imani Perry. They discuss what it means for artists and thinkers to speak out against injustice in this moment, and how humility can function as both a virtue and a form of submission.
Wednesday, May 27, 2020
Princeton seniors Matthew Oakland and Olivia Ott have been awarded two of the University’s highest awards for graduating students. Oakland, of Elk Grove, California, has been given the Frederick Douglass Service Award. Ott, of Hailey, Idaho, received the Harold Willis Dodds Achievement Prize.
Wednesday, May 27, 2020
Four Princeton University faculty members have been named recipients of the Graduate Mentoring Awards by the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning and will be honored during the Graduate School’s virtual Hooding ceremony at 4 p.m., Friday, May 29.
Thursday, May 21, 2020
In 1911, the Baltimore Afro-American(link is external) reported that a Philadelphia African American man declared Cambridge, Maryland “not a prosperous field for a street preacher.” The man arrived in Cambridge at the end of September and “expound[ed] the Word to the many who frequent[ed] Water street and its environments.” Unfortunately, “he...
Thursday, May 21, 2020
Join us in rewatching this 2018 conversation with Imani Perry and Eddie Glaude, Jr, discussing Perry's research on Lorraine Hansberry and her book Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry.
Tuesday, May 19, 2020
The rise of Black pulp fiction was largely attributed to the success of Blaxpoitation films, like Dolemite, which offered a more raw depiction of African American daily life in the 1970's. Princeton Assistant Professor of English Kinohi Nishikawa sat down with host Dr. Mark Anthony Neal to discuss these trends and his newest publication, Street...
Monday, May 18, 2020
In her latest book, “Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code,” Ruha Benjamin offers a detailed, critical and sobering view of the ways in which bias is infused into technology.
Monday, May 18, 2020
There are limits to what ordinary people are willing to endure to secure the bottom line of their employers.
Friday, May 15, 2020
Nicole Fleetwood's new book is a powerful document of the inner lives and creative visions of men and women rendered invisible by Americas prison system. We invite you out for a conversation between her and acclaimed scholar and critic Ruha Benjamin.
Friday, May 15, 2020
Professor Eddie Glaude Jr. argues that we must grapple with the divides at the core of our society in order to reimagine the U.S. with a fully inclusive sense of "us." "What we have to do is tell the truth about who we are. We’re not the best country in the world."
Thursday, May 14, 2020
The Institute of Fine Arts is delighted to welcome Chika Okeke-Agulu as the Kirk Varnedoe Visiting Professor for the spring 2020 semester.
Thursday, May 14, 2020
In the richest country in the world, it has never been more urgent to provide decent and comfortable housing for all.
Thursday, May 7, 2020
Hansberry "did not assume she knew all the answers, but she did want to see a less violent and more revolutionary world brought into existence. Hansberry never survived to see that world, but Perry’s recovery of her vision has made it all the more possible."
Thursday, May 7, 2020
by Eddie S. Glaude Jr.
Join Professor Eddie S. Glaude Jr. as he reads from his forthcoming book Begin Again:  James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own.
Wednesday, May 6, 2020
"Cooking's become a way for me to slow down." Anna Arabindan-Kesson prepares recipes from her childhood with her two young sons during this lockdown. She remembers her childhood in Sri Lanka and Australia, and reflects on questions of memory and heritage through physical practices. 
Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Anna Arabindan-Kesson and Aisha Khan discuss the new series "Undisciplined Pleasures, Vigilant Defiance" with artist Sarah Khan.

Tuesday, May 5, 2020
A deeply researched and rigorously argued account of the public-private partnership that replaced redlining with even more predatory and destructive practices.
Friday, May 1, 2020
Historically, pandemics have forced humans to break with the past and imagine their world anew. This one is no different. It is a portal, a gateway between one world and the next.
Wednesday, Apr 29, 2020
The stakes of this year's elections demonstrate the urgency of voting reforms to ensure that no one has to choose between their health and the health of their democracy. 
Friday, Apr 24, 2020

How should abolitionists respond to the coronavirus pandemic?

How can we achieve urgently needed decarceration for the millions of people caged in jails, prisons, and immigration detention centers?

Wednesday, Apr 22, 2020
Thousands of white Americans have also died from the virus, but the pace at which African-Americans are dying has transformed this public-health crisis into an object lesson in racial and class inequality. According to a Reuters report, African-Americans are more likely to die of COVID-19 than any other group in the U.S. It is still early in the...
Friday, Apr 17, 2020
The immediate immiseration of millions of people highlights our mutual bond.
Friday, Apr 10, 2020

Americans have been told to brace themselves for difficult days ahead. The numbers are uncertain, but mass death is at our doorstep. If we do everything right and shelter in place, we may still see between 100,000 and 240,000 dead.

Wednesday, Apr 8, 2020
by Department of African American Studies

Thursday, Apr 2, 2020
The argument for resuming a viable social-welfare state is about not only attending to the immediate needs of tens of millions of people but also reëstablishing social connectivity, collective responsibility, and a sense of common purpose, if not common wealth.
Wednesday, Mar 4, 2020
This was but the most recent example of the injustice of the NCAA’s insistence on amateurism, which claims the purity of having no money in the game while at the same time constructing a multibillion-dollar industry around college athletics. This massive business is built on the backs of athletes, the majority of whom are black, and the profits go...
Monday, Mar 2, 2020
Harlem in the 1920s was perhaps unlike any other place in America. While artists like Louis Armstrong, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston still endure, dozens if not hundreds of works from that period have been lost, forgotten, or never published. Now, they're coming to life for the first time.
Wednesday, Feb 26, 2020
Eddie S. Glaude Jr., the chair of the Department of African American Studies and the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of African American Studies was joined on stage by LaTosha Brown, an award-winning organizer, philanthropic consultant, political strategist, and jazz singer. Brown is the co-founder of Black Voters Matter Fund...
Wednesday, Feb 19, 2020
Comments about New Deal-era housing discrimination made by presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg echo a familiar narrative about minority homeowners.
Monday, Feb 17, 2020
“In 1887, a group of former slaves ventured into Mississippi swampland, beating back lizards, mosquitoes and wild animals. They cleared walls of brush and trees, forming what would become the first all-black town in America…”
Tags:  Research
Thursday, Feb 13, 2020
Three Princeton professors shared their views on how race is shaping the upcoming presidential election as part of a panel discussion titled “Race and Politics in 2020,” held Feb. 11 at the Carl A. Fields Center for Equality and Cultural Understanding. The event was organized in honor of Black History Month and was sponsored by three of Princeton’...
Wednesday, Feb 5, 2020
The Institute of Fine Arts is delighted to welcome Chika Okeke-Agulu as the Kirk Varnedoe Visiting Professor for the spring 2020 semester.
Wednesday, Jan 22, 2020
Area residents and members of the University community packed the lobbies, studios and galleries of the Art Council of Princeton’s Paul Robeson Center for the Arts on Monday, Jan. 20, for its annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day event, co-sponsored by Princeton University.
Tuesday, Jan 21, 2020
Mario Moore, the artist behind the paintings, views his artwork as more than just decoration. By showcasing the university's workers, he wants to pay tribute to them and "put them in positions of power," he told CNN.
Monday, Jan 13, 2020
Howard Zinn wrote one of the most popular books on American history ever. A People’s History of the United States has sold an astonishing two million copies since its first publication in 1980. The success of the book can also be measured by the way that it spawned a new genre of “people-centered” renditions of history. Zinn’s approach to history...
Thursday, Dec 12, 2019
The new epistolary memoirs, however, are less interested in stitching a life into a tidy narrative shroud than in ripping it from its seams.
Tuesday, Dec 10, 2019
We should be judicious in who we invite to campus and cultivate a culture of debate not for its own sake but in pursuit of the truth that gives respect to all people.
Thursday, Dec 5, 2019
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor on how the real estate industry undermined black homeownership.
Friday, Nov 22, 2019
by Heath Pearson

What does it mean to belong to the African American intellectual tradition?

Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019
by Cierra Robson
In Stanhope, our professors, post-docs, graduate students, and undergraduate colleagues push us to ask normative questions about power. More than what is, we ask what should be. The department’s multidisciplinary approach teaches us that reforms of broken systems are not enough, that some of the best solutions come from the imagined worlds of...
Tuesday, Nov 5, 2019

Beginning in September 2019, the Lunder Institute for American Art will host annually a Distinguished Scholar and a group of Research Fellows at varying stages of their careers to pursue original scholarship around a topic of particular concern to the field of American art. As the Lunder Institute Distinguished Scholar and Director of Research...

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019
Data & Society welcomes Princeton Professor Ruha Benjamin to discuss the relationship between machine bias and systemic racism, analyzing specific cases of “discriminatory design” and offering tools for a socially-conscious approach to tech development.
Thursday, Oct 24, 2019

For the past few years, Princeton has been embroiled in debate about iconography and the representation of history on campus. Chief among these concerns is the presence of Woodrow Wilson in prominent spaces: a residential college and the School of Public and International Affairs.

Monday, Oct 21, 2019
Recent Certificate recipient, Heath Pearson, Ph.D. sits down with American Jazz Trumpeter, Christian Scott, to discuss his inspirations, his creative process, and the importance of musically challenging himself.
Thursday, Oct 10, 2019
More than 1,200 Princeton alumni and guests came to campus Thursday through Saturday, Oct. 3-5, for “Thrive: Empowering and Celebrating Princeton’s Black Alumni.” The gathering featured discussions with alumni, faculty and students, networking and social opportunities, performing arts showcases, entrepreneurship workshops and a startup showcase,...
Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019
The author and academic tells The Nation, “We don’t have to live like this.”
Friday, Sep 20, 2019
Among the top ten nominated authors is Professor Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. Taylor's book, “Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership” has been nominated for the 2019 National Book Award for Nonfiction.
Saturday, Sep 7, 2019
What she and Venus have accomplished is far more important than future titles and broken records.
Friday, Sep 6, 2019
by Department of African American Studies
We sit down with Eddie Glaude Jr. and Julian E. Zelizer, Author, and Professor at Princeton University, to discuss the challenges of balancing and teaching within the academic and public media arena. They then explore the historical cycle of racialized politics displayed by President Donald Trump and its impact within America as we approach the...
Tuesday, Sep 3, 2019
In her new book Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code, Ruha Benjamin breaks down the “New Jim Code,” technology design that promises a utopian future but serves racial hierarchies and racial bias. When people change how they speak or act in order to conform to dominant norms, we call it “code-switching.” And, like other...
Monday, Aug 26, 2019
Princeton University professor Imani Perry offered her thoughts on race, gender, and class in America.
Tuesday, Aug 6, 2019
World-renowned writer and Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, the Robert F. Goheen Professor in the Humanities, Emeritus, at Princeton University, died last night. She was 88.
Thursday, Jul 25, 2019
Five Princeton professors talk about how the books on their shelves relate to their work and share what’s on their summer reading lists. The illustrations, by Matilda Luk, depict a curated selection each professor pulled from their bookshelves, including one book of note.
Wednesday, Jul 17, 2019
A research and civic-engagement project delves into an uprising and its aftermath
Friday, Jul 12, 2019
In this Graduate Series Interview, Jordie Davies (moderator) sits down with Keahnan Washington to discuss the influence of Black Politics, Activist Movements; like Black Lives Matter, and the importance of voting in today's political climate.
Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019
How should the struggle for reparations for slavery fit into a broader political strategy for the left?
Monday, Jul 8, 2019
In this Graduate Series Interview, Misty De Berry (moderator) and Ajanet S. Rountree sit down with Professor Soyica Colbert during the Black Impossible Conference. Professor Colbert shares her insights on the relationship between Black Women Scholars and Black cultural production.
Tags:  Featured, Interview
Wednesday, Jul 3, 2019
Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Professor of African-American Studies at Princeton University, joined the Rosa-Luxemburg-Stiftung in June 2019 to hold a joint Luxemburg Lecture and W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Lecture at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. For those who missed out, her lecture and the subsequent discussion is now available to...
Monday, Jul 1, 2019
In this Graduate Series Interview, we listen in as Kirk Maynard (moderator), Steven Gayle, and Brandan “BMike” Odums explore contemporary issues from the lens of creatives and artists.
Tuesday, Jun 25, 2019

Stories have been told for almost two millennia about the Virgin Mary and the miracles she has performed for the faithful who call upon her name. One of the most important collections of such folktales is the body of almost 700 Ethiopian Marian miracles, written from the 1300s through the 1900s, in the ancient African language of Gəˁəz (also...

Tuesday, Jun 25, 2019
In Jezebel Unhinged: Loosing the Black Female Body in Religion and Culture, black feminist scholar of religion Tamura Lomax contends with and deconstructs deeply racialized, gendered, and sexualized cultural pathologies about Black women and girls. Lomax builds on the work of Black feminists and womanists, including but not limited to bell hooks,...
Wednesday, Jun 12, 2019
In 2019, the Department of the African American Studies had the pleasure of graduating the second cohort of AAS Concentrators. We have no doubt that these three scholars will continue to excel and make an impact in the world.
Monday, Jun 10, 2019

The Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University announces more than $123,000 in awards to support the summer projects and research of 52 Princeton undergraduates, chosen from 80 applicants.

Wednesday, Jun 5, 2019
"Today I'm coming to you live from TEACHx, an annual celebration of experiments in teaching with technology. I am truly honored and humbled to have the opportunity to speak with the conference’s keynote speaker, Dr. Ruha Benjamin, a professor of African-American studies at Princeton University and the author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights...
Thursday, May 23, 2019
Donald Joseph Goines was born on December 15, 1936, in Chicago. Father Joseph and mother Myrtle were hardworking migrants from the South who had managed to open up their own cleaning store. Around 1940 the family, which included older sister Marie, relocated to Detroit and resumed the cleaning business. It was in the Motor City that, ac­cording to...
Thursday, May 23, 2019
My grandmother always reminds me: you have lost your mother-tongue. When I return to Sri Lanka for brief visits, she tells me how I used to understand her. Like my nephews and nieces do now when I was a child, I would listen to spoken Tamil and reply in English. There is nothing I can say to her accusation except to agree. Yes, I have lost my...
Wednesday, May 22, 2019
What is Professor Goldthree reading? We sat down with Reena Goldthree, Professor of Caribbean History at Princeton University, and talked about some of the most exciting books on her shelf right now. Here is what she had to say...
Wednesday, May 22, 2019
Making history once more!

This year, African American Studies welcomes thirteen new sophomores as concentrators to the department. This is is the largest class of AAS concentrators in the Department's history! Meet the new concentrators below. Not Pictured: Aisha Tahir, and Kiki Gilbert

 

Monday, May 13, 2019
Morrison came to Princeton in 1989 to teach literature and creative writing. During her 17 years of teaching, she played a key role in expanding the University’s commitments to the creative and performing arts and to African American studies. In 1994, she founded the Princeton Atelier, which brings together undergraduate students in...
Friday, May 3, 2019
More simply put, in Hurston’s syntactic structure Lewis cannot be reduced to an object, the piece of wood that should make material what otherwise exists in memories, stories, and oral histories. And thus, in this brief moment, Hurston evokes the question that she would grapple with over and over in her career: How do you produce evidence of black...
Friday, May 3, 2019
While Langston Hughes, Billie Holiday and Ralph Ellison are not known as being “religious” figures, they have, in a way, become “sacred” figures. Revered, iconic and inspirational, their essential work contributed mightily to the creative climate of twentieth-century America, and did so in the midst of complex and evolving religious currents they...
Thursday, May 2, 2019
JORDAN PEELE HAS STOCKED his film Us with enough terrifying, indelible images to haunt viewers’ dreams for many nights after they leave the theater: golden shears, caged white rabbits, hands dripping blood, and a creepy, animatronic owl that gets its comeuppance toward the movie’s end. Among these images is one more: a massive, eerily lit...
Tuesday, Apr 30, 2019
In this episode, Prof. Eddie Glaude discusses with Professor Anna Arabindan-Kesson her application of research on textiles, music, and photography for her upcoming work Black Bodies White Gold. Professor Kesson, an Art Historian at heart, reveals the history and connections of blacks and cotton and their turbulent history across America and...
Monday, Apr 29, 2019
Vampirically, white vitality feeds on black demise—from the extraction of (re)productive slave labor to build the nation’s wealth to the ongoing erection of prison complexes to resuscitate rural economies—in these ways and many more, white life and black death are inextricable. Racist structures not only produce, but reproduce whiteness, by...
Monday, Apr 29, 2019
The Princeton University Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) selected five undergraduates as 2019 Arthur Liman Fellows in Public Interest Law. Of the five undergraduates selected, three are African American Studies Concentrators.
Wednesday, Apr 17, 2019
Lincoln signed a bill in 1862 that paid up to $300 for every enslaved person freed.
Tags:  History, Research
Thursday, Apr 11, 2019
Princeton University junior Nathan Poland has been awarded a 2019 Truman Scholarship, which provides up to $30,000 toward graduate school and the opportunity to participate in professional development programs to prepare for careers in public service.
Wednesday, Apr 10, 2019

Editor’s Note: This article represents the views and opinions of the author only and does not necessarily represent the views of The Daily Princetonian. President Eisgruber has answered the questions of Ban the Box campaigners in meetings that the Prince has covered; more information can be...

Monday, Apr 8, 2019
Over the spring break, we set out for London in search of the archives and traveling histories of some of the itinerant and exiled thinkers we were studying. We followed the route of several deportees from the U.S. back to Brixton, a neighborhood in South London where Trinidadian writer C.L.R. James and his compatriot Claudia Jones ended up after...
Tuesday, Apr 2, 2019
Studies have shown that black students are subjected to higher disciplinary rates than whites, resulting in a number of negative life outcomes, including involvement in the criminal justice system.
Tags:  Research
Monday, Mar 25, 2019
Barkley L. Hendricks’s work has been compared to the realism of artists like Philip Pearlstein and William Bailey, both of whom were included in an exhibition entitled Seven Realists held at the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, in 1974, the same year that Family Jules (No Naked Niggahs) 1974 (Tate L02979) was painted.1Hendricks’s art has...
Monday, Mar 25, 2019
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, assistant professor of African American studies at Princeton University, and Robin M. Boylorn, assistant professor of interpersonal and intercultural communication studies at the University of Alabama, spoke about Sojourner Truth at the Fairfax Campus.
Tuesday, Mar 19, 2019
Ethiopian scholars and priests shared their knowledge of Ethiopia’s ancient tradition of written literature and bound manuscripts with a large audience at Princeton on March 12.
Wednesday, Mar 13, 2019
by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Michelle Obama’s new book reduces racial inequality to a matter of psychological impairment that can be overcome through grit and grin. This is a dangerous proposition.
Tuesday, Mar 12, 2019
Professional football player and activist Michael Bennett is used to crowds of thousands in stadiums. On March 11, he greeted a slightly smaller, but no less enthusiastic crowd in Richardson Auditorium at Princeton as he settled into a leather armchair.
Tuesday, Mar 12, 2019
In this episode, Eddie Glaude sits down with Professor Wendy Belcher to discuss her recent book. Prof. Belcher reveals her connection to Ethiopia, and how her life experiences of growing up white in Africa seep through her perspective and understanding. Professor Belcher explains how her curiosity pushed her to research, archive, and translation...
Friday, Mar 8, 2019
From lock-ins to rallies, the Daily Princetonian features 50 years of black student activism on the Princeton University campus. 
Friday, Mar 8, 2019

El Anatsui's survey exhibition "Triumphant Scale" at Haus der Kunst – the first ever in Europe – is the most comprehensive and detailed presentation of his oeuvre thus far. Occupying the entire East Wing, the exhibition comprises key works from five decades of the artist's career.

Friday, Mar 8, 2019

With its first cohort of concentrators freshly graduated in June 2018, the Department of African American Studies (AAS) is looking to continue its work in education and research that engages...

Friday, Mar 1, 2019
The PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography is awarded for excellence in the art of biography. This prize of $5,000 goes to the author of a distinguished work published in the United States during the previous calendar year. The winning title is considered by the judges to be a work of exceptional literary, narrative, and artistic merit,...
Wednesday, Feb 27, 2019
by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
The most important struggle in the US today is stopping the growth of the racist right-wing.

The white supremacist rampage in Charlottesville, Virginia was the predictable outcome of the Republican Party’s racist agenda and Donald Trump’s ascension to the presidency. 

Tuesday, Feb 26, 2019
Mellody Hobson, Class of ’91, visited campus this weekend after receiving the distinguished Woodrow Wilson Award. Hobson is the president of Ariel Investments and serves as a member on many corporate boards including that of Starbucks.
Tags:  Event Recap
Tuesday, Feb 26, 2019
Civil rights icon and scholar Angela Davis returned to her hometown of Birmingham, Alabama, over the weekend. She originally planned the visit to receive the Fred L. Shuttlesworth Human Rights Award from the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, but the institute withdrew the award last month, soon after the Birmingham Holocaust Education Center sent...
Friday, Feb 22, 2019
The uncontested center of the black pulp fiction universe for more than four decades was the Los Angeles publisher Holloway House. From the late 1960s until it closed in 2008, Holloway House specialized in cheap paperbacks with page-turning narratives featuring black protagonists in crime stories, conspiracy thrillers, prison novels, and Westerns...
Monday, Feb 18, 2019
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
How to live a creative life was the topic of a conversation between musician Questlove and Princeton professor Imani Perry on Feb. 15 at McCarter Theatre Center. The drummer, producer and author discussed the beauty of music, the benefits of boredom and the blocks of West Philadelphia where he grew up.
Wednesday, Feb 6, 2019
Professors Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Jelani Cobb, Jamilah Lemieux, Mychal Denzel Smith, George Wallace, and Walter Naegle are here to remind you that Black History is American History and it doesn't fit in one tweet.
Friday, Feb 1, 2019
The catastrophic 2017 hurricane season, which included two category 5 storms, briefly thrust the islands of the Caribbean to the forefront of the U.S. news cycle. The deadly hurricanes highlighted the Caribbean’s heightened vulnerability to weather-related disasters and the devastating effects of climate change.
Tags:  Featured, History
Tuesday, Jan 29, 2019
As we step into 2019, Professor Eddie Glaude, Jr. and Associate Professor Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor discuss and review the political climate of America. Professor Taylor points out the importance of continuing to organize and mobilize social activism, like Black Lives Matter, with the understanding that a single objective is more significant than...
Tags:  AAS Podcast
Friday, Jan 25, 2019
James Baldwin’s novel flopped in 1974. But Barry Jenkins’ film reveals the timely masterpiece it was.
Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019
by NowThis
Professor Eddie Glaude, Jr. shares his insights on the often overlooked radical truths of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Though mainstream society remembers Dr. King's speeches of reform and peace, we must also not forget the disruptive nature of his dream for a better future. 
Thursday, Nov 29, 2018
by Matthew Miller, Class of 2019

Writing about race has transformed the life of Ta-Nehisi Coates since his 2015 book, “Between the World and Me,” was published to widespread acclaim. It placed him at the forefront of the national discussion about issues surrounding America’s racial history. On Nov.

Friday, Sep 28, 2018

The American Academy of Religion (AAR) has selected the 2018 recipients of the Awards for Excellence in the Study of Religion and the Best First Book in the History of Religions. This annual competition recognizes new scholarly publications that make significant contributions to the study of religion.

Tuesday, Jul 10, 2018
AAS 21 is a podcast conversation about the books and ideas animating the field of African American Studies in the 21st Century and the political, economic, and cultural forces that shape our understanding of race and racial groups. We invite you to listen as we “read” how race and culture are produced globally – looking past outcomes to beginnings...
Tags:  AAS Podcast
Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018
by AAS21

Professor Tera Hunter, a professor of history and African American studies at Princeton, has been awarded the Mary Nickliss Prize in U.S.

Monday, Apr 9, 2018

The annual James Baldwin Lecture series was launched March 29, 2006 with the inaugural lecture presented by Kwame Anthony Appiah, the Princeton University Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values.

Tags:  Press Release
Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018
Welcome to the AAS 21 Podcast. I'm Eddie Glaude, and I'm the Chair of African American Studies here at Princeton University. I'm delighted to have joined us today Professor Ruha Benjamin. She's in Social Professor here in the Department of African American Studies and a Faculty Associate in the Program on History of Science, the Center for Health...
Tags:  AAS Podcast
Monday, Feb 19, 2018
Professor Guild specializes in 20th century African-American social and cultural history, urban history, and then making of the modern African Diaspora with particular interest in migration, black internationalism, black popular music, and the black radical tradition.
Tags:  AAS Podcast
Thursday, Jan 25, 2018
by AAS21

Every summer, Princeton University students travel overseas for unique six-week courses to explore the international dimensions of their academic interests. This year, the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies will launch four new Global Seminars — including “...

Friday, Dec 15, 2017
Hello. I'm Eddie Glaude and I'm the chair of the Department of African-American studies here at Princeton University. And welcome to the African-American Studies podcast. Today I'm delighted to have as our guest my new and wonderful colleague, Professor Autumn Womack. Professor Womack specializes in 19th century and early 20th century African-...
Tags:  AAS Podcast
Monday, Nov 27, 2017
by AAS21

The Paul Hair Prize is presented in odd-numbered years to recognize the best critical edition or translation into English of primary source materials on Africa published during the preceding two years. The award is administered by the Association for the Preservation and Publication of African Historical Sources (APPAHS). It is announced at the...

Wednesday, Nov 22, 2017
by AAS21

Jordan Thomas, of Newark, New Jersey, is concentrating in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and is also earning certificates in Portuguese language and culture and African...

Monday, Nov 6, 2017
Hello, I'm Eddie Glaude and I am the chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University and welcome to the African American Studies podcast. I'm delighted to have with me today my new and brilliant colleague, Reena Goldthree. Professor Goldthree specializes in the history of Latin America and the Caribbean. Her research...
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Wednesday, Aug 2, 2017
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Thursday, Jun 8, 2017
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Thursday, Jun 8, 2017
by AAS21

A committee of faculty, undergraduate and graduate students, and academic administrators selected the winners from nominations by students, faculty colleagues and alumni. The awards were established in 1991 through a gift by Princeton alumni Lloyd Cotsen of the Class of 1950 and John Sherrerd of the Class of 1952 to recognize excellence in...

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Thursday, May 25, 2017
by AAS21

The primary mission of the Brodsky Center is to enable groundbreaking artists, both established and emerging, to create new work in paper and print. Artists-in-residence are invited to engage in one-on-one collaborations with the Brodsky Center’s master printers and papermakers.

Thursday, May 25, 2017
by AAS21

Uncovering the experiences of African American spouses in plantation records, legal and court documents, and pension files, Tera W. Hunter reveals the myriad ways couples adopted, adapted, revised, and rejected white Christian ideas of marriage.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017
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Tuesday, May 2, 2017
by AAS21

This spring several Princeton University graduate students pursuing graduate certification in the Department of African American Studies earned awards and fellowships to support continued research in African American Studies and intersecting fields. The graduate certificate provides an opportunity for graduate students to complement doctoral...

Thursday, Apr 6, 2017
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Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017
by AAS21

The Johns Hopkins for Institutional and Clinical Researchsponsor the Henrietta Lacks Memorial Lecture Series with the goal of honoring the...

Thursday, Dec 8, 2016

 

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Friday, Oct 21, 2016
by AAS21

The next president will have to face growing economic precarity for a large portion of the American public.

Wednesday, Oct 5, 2016
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Wednesday, Oct 5, 2016
by AAS21

The Board of Directors of Lannan Foundation announces the winner of this year’s Cultural Freedom Especially Notable Book Award: From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, written by Princeton University African American Studies professor and activist Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor.

Tuesday, Mar 15, 2016
by AAS21

Chika Okeke-Agulu, associate professor of art and archaeology and African American studies, has been awarded the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism from the College Art Association (CAA) for his book Postcolonial...

Wednesday, Mar 9, 2016
by AAS21

Writer Jennifer Howard explores the early life and significant work of Professor Wendy Laura Belcher, and where the two intersect, in a feature profile, "A Broader Notion of African Literature," which appeared in the September 2015 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Belcher spent three years living in Ethiopia as an adolescent, and...

Friday, Jan 8, 2016
by AAS21

The 2015 - 2016 academic year is not yet half-way over, yet the year has already brought about much to recognize and celebrate. Eddie S. Glaude Jr. and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor released new books in the month of January, and Chika Okeke Agulu's recent book has won a major award.

Friday, Nov 20, 2015
by AAS21

As Princeton faculty, we write in support of our students who are currently occupying the President's office and those who are supporting them across campus. These are difficult times. And there is a palpable sense that, even as we struggle to make Princeton a better institution, students of color, particularly black students, all too often...

Monday, Oct 19, 2015
by AAS21

Each academic year, the Department of African American Studies selects postdoctoral fellows to spend a year at Princeton where they will use their expertise to write about race, as well as, instruct a departmental course for one semester.

Thursday, Sep 17, 2015
by AAS21

Nell Painter's new course, Art School at African American Studies, combines actual making with art criticism.

Thursday, Sep 17, 2015
by AAS21

The Ferguson is the Future symposium brought together scholars, activists and artists and asked: what stories about power, difference, and belonging fuel the social crises we face today? How does visionary fiction offer us models for creating new possible worlds? Can the combined insights and interventions of artists, activists, and scholars...

Wednesday, Sep 16, 2015
by AAS21

"Princeton's outstanding faculty members in African American studies address cultural, social and political issues of urgent importance to our students, our nation and the world," President Christopher L.

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The AAS Podcast

Our podcast, formerly known as the AAS21 Podcast, acts as a conversation around the field of African American Studies and the black experience in the 21st century.
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