Featured

  • Graduate Reflection: The Experience of Heath Pearson, Ph.D.

    Friday, Nov 22, 2019
    by Heath Pearson

    What does it mean to belong to the African American intellectual tradition?

    Professors Eddie Glaude and Imani Perry asked this question as we sat in the first session of “AAS 500: African-American Intellectual Tradition.” It has stuck with me. And in September, when I begin a fellowship at the University of Michigan, with an appointment as an assistant professor in the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, it will be my turn to help others explore this question. 

  • [AAS Podcast] Episode #17: Legacy and Racialized Politics

    Friday, Sep 6, 2019
    by Department of African American Studies
    We sit down with Eddie Glaude Jr. and Julian E. Zelizer, Author, and Professor at Princeton University, to discuss the challenges of balancing and teaching within the academic and public media arena. They then explore the historical cycle of racialized politics displayed by President Donald Trump and its impact within America as we approach the 2020 Elections
  • White Supremacy and Artificial Intelligence

    Tuesday, Sep 3, 2019
    In her new book Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code, Ruha Benjamin breaks down the “New Jim Code,” technology design that promises a utopian future but serves racial hierarchies and racial bias. When people change how they speak or act in order to conform to dominant norms, we call it “code-switching.” And, like other types of codes, the practice of code-switching is power-laden. Justine Cassell, a professor at Carnegie Mellon’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute, creates educational programs for children and found that avatars using African American Vernacular English lead Black children “to achieve better results in teaching scientific concepts than when the computer spoke in standard English.” But when it came to tutoring the children for class presentations, she explained that, “We wanted it [the avatar] to practice with them in ‘proper English.’ Standard American English is still the code of power, so we needed to develop an agent that would train them in code-switching.” This reminds us that whoever defines the standard expression exercises power over everyone else, who is forced to fit in or else risks getting pushed out. But what is the alternative?
  • Luxemburg Lecture: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, "From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation"

    Wednesday, Jul 3, 2019
    Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Professor of African-American Studies at Princeton University, joined the Rosa-Luxemburg-Stiftung in June 2019 to hold a joint Luxemburg Lecture and W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Lecture at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. For those who missed out, her lecture and the subsequent discussion is now available to watch online:
  • Insights on Black Women Scholars & Black Cultural Production

    Monday, Jul 8, 2019
    In this Graduate Series Interview, Misty De Berry (moderator) and Ajanet S. Rountree sit down with Professor Soyica Colbert during the Black Impossible Conference. Professor Colbert shares her insights on the relationship between Black Women Scholars and Black cultural production.

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