Featured

  • 2019 AAS Senior Spotlight and Thesis

    Wednesday, Jun 12, 2019

    Micah Richard Herskind

    Buffalo, New York  

    Micah Herskind, from Buffalo, NY, is a member of the Class of 2019 focusing on Race and Public Policy while pursuing a certificate in the American Studies Program. Micah was drawn to the African American Studies department through his involvement with Students for Prison Education and Reform (SPEAR) and summer internships, where he has learned about the carceral state’s disproportionate impact on people of color and those living in poverty.

  • Dr. Ruha Benjamin featured in Episode 12 of the Northwestern Digital Learning Podcast.

    Wednesday, Jun 5, 2019
    "Today I'm coming to you live from TEACHx, an annual celebration of experiments in teaching with technology. I am truly honored and humbled to have the opportunity to speak with the conference’s keynote speaker, Dr. Ruha Benjamin, a professor of African-American studies at Princeton University and the author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier and the forthcoming Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code. She has studied the social dimensions of science, technology, and medicine for just over 15 years and speaks widely on issues of innovation, equity, health, and justice."
  • What is Tamil for Loss? Remembering the Sri Lankan Civil War

    Thursday, May 23, 2019
    My grandmother always reminds me: you have lost your mother-tongue. When I return to Sri Lanka for brief visits, she tells me how I used to understand her. Like my nephews and nieces do now when I was a child, I would listen to spoken Tamil and reply in English. There is nothing I can say to her accusation except to agree. Yes, I have lost my mother tongue, the words, the sounds, the rhythms of speaking to which I was born. I willfully lost this language, after we moved to Australia where my voice, my skin, my body continually marked me as foreign, different, other. As we all know, primary school children can be cruel: losing my mother-tongue was a way to survive.
  • AAS Welcomes New Sophomores

    Wednesday, May 22, 2019

    Making history once more!

    This year, African American Studies welcomes thirteen new sophomores as concentrators to the department. This is is the largest class of AAS concentrators in the Department's history! Meet the new concentrators below. Not Pictured: Aisha Tahir, and Kiki Gilbert

     

  • ‘Reading’ Toni Morrison: Students explore Princeton’s literary icon from archive to page

    Monday, May 13, 2019
    Morrison came to Princeton in 1989 to teach literature and creative writing. During her 17 years of teaching, she played a key role in expanding the University’s commitments to the creative and performing arts and to African American studies. In 1994, she founded the Princeton Atelier, which brings together undergraduate students in interdisciplinary collaborations with acclaimed artists. In 2016, Princeton University Library announced that the the major portion of the Toni Morrison Papers, which had been part of the permanent library collections since 2014, were open for research to students, faculty and scholars worldwide. (One item from the Morrison Papers, a handwritten manuscript draft of “Beloved,” is on view through June 23 in the exhibition “Welcome Additions: Selected Acquisitions 2012-18” in Firestone Library’s Milberg Gallery.) In 2017, the University dedicated the naming of Morrison Hall, formerly West College, in her honor.
  • Read an Excerpt of ‘Street Players: Black Pulp Fiction and the Making of a Literary Underground’

    Friday, Feb 22, 2019
    The uncontested center of the black pulp fiction universe for more than four decades was the Los Angeles publisher Holloway House. From the late 1960s until it closed in 2008, Holloway House specialized in cheap paperbacks with page-turning narratives featuring black protagonists in crime stories, conspiracy thrillers, prison novels, and Westerns that gave readers an unfailing veneration of black masculinity. Zeroing in on Holloway House, Kinohi Nishikawa’s Street Players explores how this world of black pulp fiction was produced, received, and recreated over time and across different communities of readers. 
  • Questlove talks living a creative life with Princeton’s Imani Perry

    Monday, Feb 18, 2019
    by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
    How to live a creative life was the topic of a conversation between musician Questlove and Princeton professor Imani Perry on Feb. 15 at McCarter Theatre Center. The drummer, producer and author discussed the beauty of music, the benefits of boredom and the blocks of West Philadelphia where he grew up.
  • New Directions in Caribbean History

    Friday, Feb 1, 2019
    The catastrophic 2017 hurricane season, which included two category 5 storms, briefly thrust the islands of the Caribbean to the forefront of the U.S. news cycle. The deadly hurricanes highlighted the Caribbean’s heightened vulnerability to weather-related disasters and the devastating effects of climate change.
  • Prof. Glaude shares with NowThis the radical reality of MLK

    Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019
    by NowThis
    Professor Eddie Glaude, Jr. shares his insights on the often overlooked radical truths of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Though mainstream society remembers Dr. King's speeches of reform and peace, we must also not forget the disruptive nature of his dream for a better future. 

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