Featured

  • Read an Excerpt of ‘Street Players: Black Pulp Fiction and the Making of a Literary Underground’

    Friday, Feb 22, 2019
    The uncontested center of the black pulp fiction universe for more than four decades was the Los Angeles publisher Holloway House. From the late 1960s until it closed in 2008, Holloway House specialized in cheap paperbacks with page-turning narratives featuring black protagonists in crime stories, conspiracy thrillers, prison novels, and Westerns that gave readers an unfailing veneration of black masculinity. Zeroing in on Holloway House, Kinohi Nishikawa’s Street Players explores how this world of black pulp fiction was produced, received, and recreated over time and across different communities of readers. 
  • Questlove talks living a creative life with Princeton’s Imani Perry

    Monday, Feb 18, 2019
    by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
    How to live a creative life was the topic of a conversation between musician Questlove and Princeton professor Imani Perry on Feb. 15 at McCarter Theatre Center. The drummer, producer and author discussed the beauty of music, the benefits of boredom and the blocks of West Philadelphia where he grew up.
  • New Directions in Caribbean History

    Friday, Feb 1, 2019
    The catastrophic 2017 hurricane season, which included two category 5 storms, briefly thrust the islands of the Caribbean to the forefront of the U.S. news cycle. The deadly hurricanes highlighted the Caribbean’s heightened vulnerability to weather-related disasters and the devastating effects of climate change.
  • Prof. Glaude shares with NowThis the radical reality of MLK

    Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019
    by NowThis
    Professor Eddie Glaude, Jr. shares his insights on the often overlooked radical truths of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Though mainstream society remembers Dr. King's speeches of reform and peace, we must also not forget the disruptive nature of his dream for a better future. 
  • AAS Graduate Certificate Students Awarded Fellowships in Support of Independent Research

    Tuesday, May 2, 2017
    by AAS21

    This spring several Princeton University graduate students pursuing graduate certification in the Department of African American Studies earned awards and fellowships to support continued research in African American Studies and intersecting fields. The graduate certificate provides an opportunity for graduate students to complement doctoral studies in their home department with coordinated interdisciplinary training in African American Studies.

  • Tera Hunter wins Organization of American Historians prize for Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century

    Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018
    by AAS21

    Professor Tera Hunter, a professor of history and African American studies at Princeton, has been awarded the Mary Nickliss Prize in U.S. Women’s and/or Gender History from the Organization of American Historians (OAH) for her 2017 book, “Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century.” Hunter researched court records, legal documents and personal diaries to illustrate the constraints that slavery placed on intimate relationships.

  • Professor Wendy Laura Belcher Featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education

    Wednesday, Mar 9, 2016
    by AAS21

    Writer Jennifer Howard explores the early life and significant work of Professor Wendy Laura Belcher, and where the two intersect, in a feature profile, "A Broader Notion of African Literature," which appeared in the September 2015 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Belcher spent three years living in Ethiopia as an adolescent, and then six years in Ghana. Her first book, Honey From the Rock, was autobiographical in nature about her years spent in Africa.

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