Faculty Highlight

  • Dr. Ruha Benjamin featured in Episode 12 of the Northwestern Digital Learning Podcast.

    Wednesday, Jun 5, 2019
    "Today I'm coming to you live from TEACHx, an annual celebration of experiments in teaching with technology. I am truly honored and humbled to have the opportunity to speak with the conference’s keynote speaker, Dr. Ruha Benjamin, a professor of African-American studies at Princeton University and the author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier and the forthcoming Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code. She has studied the social dimensions of science, technology, and medicine for just over 15 years and speaks widely on issues of innovation, equity, health, and justice."
  • AAS Faculty Book Suggestions: Reena Goldthree

    Wednesday, May 22, 2019
    What is Professor Goldthree reading? We sat down with Reena Goldthree, Professor of Caribbean History at Princeton University, and talked about some of the most exciting books on her shelf right now. Here is what she had to say...
  • ‘Reading’ Toni Morrison: Students explore Princeton’s literary icon from archive to page

    Monday, May 13, 2019
    Morrison came to Princeton in 1989 to teach literature and creative writing. During her 17 years of teaching, she played a key role in expanding the University’s commitments to the creative and performing arts and to African American studies. In 1994, she founded the Princeton Atelier, which brings together undergraduate students in interdisciplinary collaborations with acclaimed artists. In 2016, Princeton University Library announced that the the major portion of the Toni Morrison Papers, which had been part of the permanent library collections since 2014, were open for research to students, faculty and scholars worldwide. (One item from the Morrison Papers, a handwritten manuscript draft of “Beloved,” is on view through June 23 in the exhibition “Welcome Additions: Selected Acquisitions 2012-18” in Firestone Library’s Milberg Gallery.) In 2017, the University dedicated the naming of Morrison Hall, formerly West College, in her honor.
  • Contraband Flesh: On Zora Neale Hurston’s Barracoon

    Friday, May 3, 2019
    More simply put, in Hurston’s syntactic structure Lewis cannot be reduced to an object, the piece of wood that should make material what otherwise exists in memories, stories, and oral histories. And thus, in this brief moment, Hurston evokes the question that she would grapple with over and over in her career: How do you produce evidence of black life without reducing black folk to inanimate facts and data?
  • Photography into Paint by Prof ARABINDAN-KESSON

    Monday, Mar 25, 2019
    Barkley L. Hendricks’s work has been compared to the realism of artists like Philip Pearlstein and William Bailey, both of whom were included in an exhibition entitled Seven Realists held at the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, in 1974, the same year that Family Jules (No Naked Niggahs) 1974 (Tate L02979) was painted.1Hendricks’s art has also been discussed in relation to the photorealist work of artists like Chuck Close, whose portrait paintings – based on photographs – present close, geometrical studies of his subjects.
  • [AAS21 Podcast] Episode #16: Black Bodies, White Gold

    Tuesday, Apr 30, 2019
    In this episode, Eddie Glaude discusses with Professor Anna Arabindan-Kesson her application of research on textiles, music, and photography for her upcoming book. Professor Kesson, an Art Historian at heart, reveals the history and nuances of blacks and cotton and the turbulent history across America and Europe. Not only does she examine the economic equivalence, in which enslaved people and cotton were commodities in the eyes of the law, but she also explores how it physically framed the way a slave looked, and intern felt. Ultimately with this research, her goal is to examine how this history complicates what it means to be free and black in today's world.

Pages

Subscribe to Faculty Highlight