Books and Literature

  • Black Pulp Fiction

    Tuesday, May 19, 2020
    The rise of Black pulp fiction was largely attributed to the success of Blaxpoitation films, like Dolemite, which offered a more raw depiction of African American daily life in the 1970's. Princeton Assistant Professor of English Kinohi Nishikawa sat down with host Dr. Mark Anthony Neal to discuss these trends and his newest publication, Street Players: Black Pulp Fiction and the Making of a Literary Underground (University of Chicago Press, 2018).
  • The Lost Secrets Of The Harlem Renaissance

    Monday, Mar 2, 2020
    by NPR
    Harlem in the 1920s was perhaps unlike any other place in America. While artists like Louis Armstrong, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston still endure, dozens if not hundreds of works from that period have been lost, forgotten, or never published. Now, they're coming to life for the first time.
  • The 2019 National Book Awards Longlist: Nonfiction

    Friday, Sep 20, 2019
    Among the top ten nominated authors is Professor Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. Taylor's book, “Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership” has been nominated for the 2019 National Book Award for Nonfiction.
  • [AAS Podcast] Episode #17: Legacy and Racialized Politics

    Friday, Sep 6, 2019
    by Department of African American Studies
    We sit down with Eddie Glaude Jr. and Julian E. Zelizer, Author, and Professor at Princeton University, to discuss the challenges of balancing and teaching within the academic and public media arena. They then explore the historical cycle of racialized politics displayed by President Donald Trump and its impact within America as we approach the 2020 Elections
  • White Supremacy and Artificial Intelligence

    Tuesday, Sep 3, 2019
    In her new book Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code, Ruha Benjamin breaks down the “New Jim Code,” technology design that promises a utopian future but serves racial hierarchies and racial bias. When people change how they speak or act in order to conform to dominant norms, we call it “code-switching.” And, like other types of codes, the practice of code-switching is power-laden. Justine Cassell, a professor at Carnegie Mellon’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute, creates educational programs for children and found that avatars using African American Vernacular English lead Black children “to achieve better results in teaching scientific concepts than when the computer spoke in standard English.” But when it came to tutoring the children for class presentations, she explained that, “We wanted it [the avatar] to practice with them in ‘proper English.’ Standard American English is still the code of power, so we needed to develop an agent that would train them in code-switching.” This reminds us that whoever defines the standard expression exercises power over everyone else, who is forced to fit in or else risks getting pushed out. But what is the alternative?

Pages

Subscribe to Books and Literature