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Reimagining Technology Fall Series: Book Roundtable, "Technovernacular Creativity & Innovation" by Nettrice Gaskins
Oct 12, 2021, 6:00 pm

Join us for a roundtable on Nettrice Gaskins’ new book, Technovernacular Creativity and Innovation (MIT Press 2021) with panelists Amelia Winger-Bearskin (Digital Worlds Institute, University of Florida) …

Location
via Zoom
Speakers
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Alumni
2021-2022 Faculty-Graduate Seminar: “Plantation Effects” ft. JT Roane, Arizona State University
Oct 12, 2021, 4:30 pm
Plantation Effects: Visual Ecologies of Race, Place and Labor

This seminar examines the multiple iterations of the plantation, and to draw from Katherine McKittrick, the kinds of futures it brings forth for us now. The plantation might be, to paraphrase Krista Thompson and Huey…

Location
Virtual
Speaker
Public / Open To All
Environmental Humanities Colloquium: “On Black Breath”
Oct 6, 2021, 4:30 pm

Kimberly Bain, an assistant professor of English language and literatures at the University of British Columbia, will present “On Black Breath” via Zoom — click here to join.

Location
Virtual via Zoom
Public / Open To All
Reading by Sherwin Bitsui and Maaza Mengiste
Oct 5, 2021, 7:30 pm

American Book Award-winning Navajo poet Sherwin Bitsui and multiple award-winning novelist/essayist Maaza Mengiste read from their work as part of the Althea Ward Clark W’21 Reading Series presented by the Program in Creative Writing.

Join the Event

The reading is free and open to the public but advance tickets are required. …

Location
Hearst Dance Theater, Lewis Arts complex
Public / Open To All
George Saunders: History and the American Imagination
Oct 5, 2021, 7:00 pm

HNY is pleased to host George Saunders and Imani Perry for our 2021 History and the American Imagination event!

George Saunders is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of ten books, including Lincoln in the Bardo, which won the Man Booker Prize; Tenth of…

Location
Virtual via Zoom
Speakers
Public / Open To All
Reimagining Technology Fall Series: Artist-in-residence Talk + Screening with Mimi Onuoha
Oct 5, 2021, 6:00 pm

Join us for a talk by Mimi Onuoha, the Ida B. Wells Just Data Lab Inaugural Artist-in-Residence, who will screen a new short film commissioned by the lab, moderated by Ruha Benjamin.

Location
via Zoom
Speakers
Public / Open To All
Working with Art: Labour, Empire and Materiality in British Art
Oct 1, 2021, 1:00 pm

This discussion focuses on meanings, and experiences, of labour and materiality in British Art. Using the representation of commodities - cotton specifically - as a starting point, this conversation considers how these themes can frame new approaches to British Art’s transatlantic, migratory and diasporic contours.

This conversation…

Location
Via Zoom
Speakers
Public / Open To All
Decolonial Abstraction: Frank Bowling’s Atlantic Errantry
Sep 30, 2021, 4:30 pm

The color field abstraction Frank Bowling produced during his time in New York from 1966 to 1975 was made possible by transatlantic journeys that cast the narrative of late modernism in an altered light. By looking closely at Bowling’s improvisational approach to the materiality of paint, this lecture examines cross-cultural frictions that…

Location
Virtual via Zoom
Speaker
Public / Open To All
Queer Politics Webinar
Sep 30, 2021, 11:30 am

We invite faculty, students, activists, advocates, practitioners and anyone with an interest in LGBTQ politics to sign up for our mailing list. We will use that list to distribute abstracts and the zoom link.

Location
Via Zoom
Speakers
Public / Open To All
An Evening with Tunde Oyeneyin: Community Grief, and Strength Beyond the Bike
Sep 28, 2021, 8:00 pm

Tunde is not just a world-renowned Peloton instructor but a Black woman with a powerful personal story of community, grief, mental health, women in fitness, identity, and the power of transformation. She will join the Princeton community to discuss her journey in conversation with Theresa S. Thames from the Office of Religious Life and Jessica…

Location
McCosh Hall Room 10
Speaker
  • By Invite Only
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Alumni
2021-2022 Faculty-Graduate Seminar: “Plantation Effects” ft. Charmaine Nelson, NSCAD University
Sep 28, 2021, 4:30 pm
Plantation Effects: Visual Ecologies of Race, Place and Labor

This seminar examines the multiple iterations of the plantation, and to draw from Katherine McKittrick, the kinds of futures it brings forth for us now. The plantation might be, to paraphrase Krista Thompson and Huey…

Location
Virtual
Speakers
Public / Open To All
Art Hx: Visual and Medical Legacies of British Colonialism “curative / spaces” series
Sep 27, 2021, 4:30 pm
Medical Bondage, Mobility, & Fugitive Logic: Revisiting Harriet Tubman as an Intellectual Figure

This event is organized as a part of Art Hx: Visual and Medical Legacies of British Colonialism. During the 2021-2022 academic year, Art Hx presents curative / spaces, a programming series that explores the relationship between race,…

Location
via Zoom
Speakers
Public / Open To All
15th Annual Humanities Colloquium | Humanities and Mobility
Sep 23, 2021, 4:30 pm

The Humanities Council’s kick-off event features a wide-ranging conversation about central issues in our research, teaching, and intellectual life. Speakers include faculty fellows Wendy Belcher, Zahid Chaudhary, and Judith Hamera. 

Open to the public. This…

Location
Virtual via Zoom
By Invite Only
Transfer and Transmission: Visualizing the Global Plantation Work in Progress (WIP) presented by Prof. Anna Arabindan-Kesson
Sep 23, 2021, 12:00 pm

This talk, based on a new book project called An Empire State of Mind: Plantation Imaginaries and British Colonialism, focuses on the mobile images and mobile forms of the plantation crossing the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. 

Positioning these spaces in conversation, the talk draws on the work of contemporary…

Speaker
Public / Open To All
Meditations from the Shoal with Tiffany King
Sep 22, 2021, 4:30 pm
Environmental Humanities and Social Transformation Colloquium

The Environmental Humanities and Social Transformation Colloquium is key to the outreach mission of the Environmental Humanities program based in the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI). Established in Fall 2017, the series aims to build an…

Location
Virtual via Zoom
Speaker
Public / Open To All
From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation & How the Cost of Policing Underfunds Us All
Sep 21, 2021, 8:00 pm

In From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, Princeton Professor of African-American Studies and 2020 Freedom Scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor examines the historical and modern moments and movements that expose how structural inequities contribute to police violence and larger systems of mass incarceration. …

Location
Virtual via Zoom
Speakers
Public / Open To All
Accounts of Slavery: Money and Mobility among Enslaved People in Seventeenth-Century New Spain
Sep 21, 2021, 5:00 pm

The transpacific galleon trade enriched Mexican merchants, who relied on enslaved and free dependents to manage merchandise and cash. Hundreds of pesos routinely moved in the pockets of enslaved people as they traversed baroque Mexico City. This talk examines lawsuits among merchants to extract fragmentary data on enslaved people trafficked…

Location
Virtual via Zoom
Speakers
Public / Open To All
2021 Princeton University Constitution Day Lecture
Sep 14, 2021, 4:30 pm

This year, professors Ruha Benjamin (AAS), Amaney Jamal (POL, SPIA), and Kevin Kruse (HIS) join, with AMS director Aisha Beliso-De Jesús moderating, in “What Kind of Republic? A Discussion on Democracy and the Constitution Today.” American Studies will present the conversation via Zoom webinar on Tuesday, Sept 14 at 4:30 pm ET, with Video Production Services live streaming to reach beyond Zoom audiences.

Location
virtual TBA
Speakers
Comparative Literature Reading Group
Sep 14, 2021, 4:30 pm

The Department of Comparative Literature is planning to host a two-year reading group centered on the works of American poet, novelist, essayist, and scholar Nathaniel Mackey beginning this fall, in anticipation of the series of lectures he will give on campus next academic year (2022-2023) through the Bain-Swiggett Poetry Fund. 

Location
East Pyne 111
Public / Open To All
Art Hx: Visual and Medical Legacies of British Colonialism “curative / spaces” series
Sep 13, 2021, 4:30 pm
“He was running it like a plantation”: Psychiatric spaces and social death in the Jim Crow South

In this presentation, Dr. Kylie Smith explores the long history of the shadow of the plantation, as both a symbol and a reality, in state psychiatric hospitals in Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi in the twentieth century…

Location
via Zoom
Speakers
Public / Open To All
REACTIVATING MEMORY Shuffle Along and the Tulsa Race Massacre: A Centennial Symposium
Sep 10, 2021, 9:30 am

One hundred years ago, the dazzling all-Black Broadway musical Shuffle Along ushered in the Jazz Age with a syncopated score and tap dancing chorus. One week later, white residents of

Location
Virtual via Zoom
Public / Open To All
Global Publishing and the Making of Literary Worlds: Translation, Media, and Mobility
Jun 4, 2021, 12:00 am

A virtual conference and publication workshop for early career scholars

2020-2021 Faculty-Graduate Seminar: “Writing the Impossible” ft. Jorge L. Giovannetti-Torres, University of Puerto Rico
Apr 22, 2021, 4:30 pm
“Writing the Impossible”: African American Studies and Critical Archival Praxis

This seminar explores approaches to archival research in the field of African American studies. Archives, as Michel-Rolph Trouillot reminds us, are not passive repositories of historical materials…

Location
via ZOOM | To register, contact Shelby Sinclair at shelbys@princeton.edu.
Speakers
Public / Open To All
Black to the Future: My Adventures in Becoming Me
Apr 13, 2021, 4:30 pm

Join us April 13 for the 2021 Meredith Miller Memorial Lecture with Cheryl Dunye, Director, Writer, Producer and Founder of

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Alumni
2020-2021 Faculty-Graduate Seminar: “Writing the Impossible” ft. Matthew J. Smith, University College London
Apr 8, 2021, 4:30 pm
“Writing the Impossible”: African American Studies and Critical Archival Praxis

This seminar explores approaches to archival research in the field of African American studies. Archives, as Michel-Rolph Trouillot reminds us, are not passive repositories of historical materials…

Location
via ZOOM | To register, contact Shelby Sinclair at shelbys@princeton.edu.
Speakers
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Alumni
  • Undergraduate Students
The Long Afterlife of Lynching in African American Southern Memory
Mar 31, 2021, 4:30 pm

Lynchings in the American South left in their wake deep psychological scars and unshakeable, and often unspeakable, memories that haunted generations of African Americans. Under the strictures of Jim Crow, African Americans knew that merely speaking of lynchings within earshot of whites—much less overtly demanding that whites reckon with…

Location
via ZOOM
Speaker
Public / Open To All
Literature for Justice: A Path Forward
Mar 31, 2021, 3:00 pm

The National Book Foundation launches the third and final year of Literature for Justice, a nationwide, book-based campaign that presents an annual reading list to further investigate the carceral system and urge readers forward. The event will feature this year’s committee members Susan Burton, Natalie Diaz, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., and Piper Kerman in conversation and selected authors—Dionne Brand (Ossuaries), Nicole R. Fleetwood (Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration), Ruth Wilson Gilmore (Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis and Opposition in Globalizing California), Sarah Haley (No Mercy Here: Gender, Punishment, and the Making of Jim Crow Modernity), Kelly Lytle Hernández (City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion, and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles, 1771-1965), and Albert Woodfox (Solitary). Moderated by Naomi Murakawa, author of The First Civil Right: How Liberals Built Prison America.

Public / Open To All
Conversation with Artists Annalee Davis and Julie Gough
Mar 25, 2021, 8:00 pm

This event will bring together two contemporary artists, Annalee Davis and Julie Gough, in conversation with Dr. Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Assistant Professor of African American Studies and Art & Archaeology at Princeton University, for a discussion on how their artistic practices are invested in exploring and highlighting the medical and scientific legacies of imperialism.

Speakers
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Alumni
2020-2021 Faculty-Graduate Seminar: “Writing the Impossible” ft. Michelle Moyd, Indiana University
Mar 25, 2021, 4:30 pm
“Writing the Impossible”: African American Studies and Critical Archival Praxis

This seminar explores approaches to archival research in the field of African American studies. Archives, as Michel-Rolph Trouillot reminds us, are not passive repositories of historical materials…

Location
via ZOOM | To register, contact Shelby Sinclair at shelbys@princeton.edu.
Speakers
Public / Open To All
Cascading Crises: Race, COVID-19, and the Matter of Life and Death
Mar 25, 2021, 4:30 pm

The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 and its particularly devastating effects on Black, Indigenous and other communities of color, served to increase the urgency of research I was already undertaking to situate contemporary racialized health disparities "in the wake" of slavery, was well as to nudge it in new directions. 

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
Public / Open To All
Mellon Forum on the Urban Environment // RESISTANCE
Mar 24, 2021, 4:30 pm

The Spring 2021 Mellon Forum on the Urban Environment is organized by Sophie Hochhäusl, Princeton Mellon Fellow, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, African American Studies. The Mellon Forum is supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Princeton University Humanities Council,…

Location
via ZOOM
Public / Open To All
Peter Kirstein Lecture Series 2021 with Professor Ruha Benjamin (Princeton University)
Mar 19, 2021, 10:30 am

In this talk, Ruha Benjamin explores a range of discriminatory designs that encode inequity -- what she terms the “New Jim Code.”

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
  • Alumni
  • Undergraduate Students
Black Student Group Showcase
Mar 17, 2021, 8:00 pm

Connecting student groups with Black alumni for an opportunity to create lasting relationships

Location
via Zoom
Public / Open To All
Gillett G. Griffin Memorial Lecture: Raina Lampkins-Fielder, Souls Grown Deep Foundation
Mar 5, 2021, 12:00 pm

Please join us for the annual Gillett G. Griffin Memorial Lecture with Raina Lampkins-Fielder, curator of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, as well as a program officer of the Foundation’s parent organization, the Souls Grown Deep Community Partnership, which supports the communities that gave rise to the 160 artists represented in its collection.

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Alumni
2020-2021 Faculty-Graduate Seminar: “Writing the Impossible” ft. Erica Williams, Spelman College
Mar 4, 2021, 4:30 pm
“Writing the Impossible”: African American Studies and Critical Archival Praxis

This seminar explores approaches to archival research in the field of African American studies. Archives, as Michel-Rolph Trouillot reminds us, are not passive repositories of historical materials…

Location
via ZOOM | To register, contact Shelby Sinclair at shelbys@princeton.edu.
Speakers
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
Prison Teaching Initiative Info Session: English, Languages, & Tutoring
Mar 4, 2021, 2:00 pm

The Prison Teaching Initiative is an all-volunteer organization based at Princeton University. PTI is committed to providing accredited college courses to incarcerated students in the state of New Jersey.

Location
via Zoom
Public / Open To All
A Conversation with Public Intellectual Eddie Glaude, Jr on the Complex Dynamics of the American Experience
Mar 4, 2021, 2:00 pm

Glaude is joining us as part of the IGL-Fletcher School Conversation Series on Race, Justice and Equity.

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
Prison Teaching Initiative Info Session: Sciences (Bio & Chem) & Math
Mar 4, 2021, 10:00 am

The Prison Teaching Initiative is an all-volunteer organization based at Princeton University. PTI is committed to providing accredited college courses to incarcerated students in the state of New Jersey.

Location
via Zoom
Public / Open To All
Risk, Relationships, and Refusal: How Relational Concerns Shape Personal Assessments of Risk and Mitigation
Mar 1, 2021, 12:00 pm

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a once-a-day HIV prevention pill, has proven to be highly effective at reducing infection, but the medication has not been widely adopted within disproportionately impacted communities. This article examines resistance to uptake by detailing how people assess their personal risk and the viability of mitigation options.

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
Graduate Students
AMS Colloquium: Khytie K. Brown
Mar 1, 2021, 12:00 pm

“Afro-Queer Journeys: The Intimacies of Spirit Travel in Jamaican Revival Zion Religion”

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
Graduate Students
PIIRS Graduate Winter and Spring Funding
Mar 1, 2021, 12:00 am

PIIRS regularly provides funding to support doctoral students interested in conducting pre-dissertation or dissertation research during the winter recess. Research must be conducted outside of the United States and may include preliminary archival reconnaissance, field-site investigations, interviews, securing official permission for research…

  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Undergraduate Students
Community Organizing 101 with Darren "Freedom" Green
Feb 26, 2021, 4:30 pm

Darren Green is a longtime Trenton activist, public speaker, and former mayoral candidate. As a part of the Organizing Stories workshop series, Green will lead a spirited workshop about the ins-and-outs of local organizing, exploring the integral role storytelling has played in his community outreach.

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
Undergraduate Students
Careers & Majors Alumni Panel Series: Social Sciences
Feb 24, 2021, 4:30 pm

Moderated by Natalia Cordova *17, the director of studies at Mathey College, this panel will feature alumni discussing the connections between their social sciences concentrations and career journeys.

Location
via Zoom
Public / Open To All
Kelsey Christina Moss - Religion, Race, and Slavery in the Americas Lecture Series
Feb 23, 2021, 4:30 pm

Spiritual Racialization: Theologies of Race and Slavery in the Colonial Atlantic World

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
Public / Open To All
One Begins Again: Organizing & the Historical Imagination
Feb 20, 2021, 9:30 am

The 41st Annual Marion Thompson Wright Lecture

It is with great pleasure that we invite you to join us for the 41st Annual Marion Thompson Wright Lecture Series, One Begins Again: Organizing & the Historical Imagination, moderated by 

Location
via Zoom
Speakers
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Alumni
2020-2021 Faculty-Graduate Seminar: “Writing the Impossible” ft. Lorgia García Peña, Harvard University
Feb 18, 2021, 4:30 pm

“Writing the Impossible”: African American Studies and Critical Archival Praxis

This seminar explores approaches to archival research in the field of African American studies. Archives, as Michel-Rolph Trouillot reminds us, are not passive repositories of historical materials. Rather, the…

Location
via ZOOM | To register, contact Shelby Sinclair at shelbys@princeton.edu.
Speakers
Public / Open To All
Intersections Working Group presents Yomaira C. Figueroa-Vásquez
Feb 16, 2021, 12:00 pm

A discussion of Decolonizing Diasporas: Radical Mappings of Afro-Atlantic Literature with Yomaira C. Figueroa-Vásquez, Associate Professor of English, African-American and African Studies at Michigan State University. If you are interested in attending the workshop and being reimbursed for a copy of the book, please register using…

Location
via Zoom
Speaker
Public / Open To All
What's in a Name? A Discussion with Princeton University and Public School Students
Feb 13, 2021, 3:00 pm

At this panel, students and teachers from Princeton Public Schools and Princeton University undergraduates will discuss their experiences advocating for these renamings. Why did these issues matter to them? What did they learn from being part of these important events? What can others gain from their experiences? As panelists reflect on these transformational moments in their communities, we will all have a chance to look back on a critical year for racial justice advocacy in Princeton and beyond.

Location
via Zoom
Public / Open To All
Abolition: Then and Now
Feb 13, 2021, 1:00 pm

As part of Douglass Day 2021, this event will feature presentations by undergraduate Princeton University students on their collaborative, virtual exhibition entitled “Abolition: Then and Now.” The students put this exhibition together as part of a final project for a fall 2020 course on the writings of Frederick Douglass and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Supported by the 250th Fund for Innovation in Undergraduate Education, the course—taught by Professor Eduardo Cadava and supported by undergraduate Shannon Chaffers ’22—encouraged the students to think about the ways in which the writings of these two towering American figures can be used as resources not only for addressing contemporary socio-political issues but also for doing political work, and especially work that goes in the direction of addressing, engaging, and perhaps even overcoming the history of racial injustice in America.

Location
via Zoom