Ancient and Modern Body Worlds in Ancient Egyptian Art

Date
Mar 3, 2022, 6:30 pm8:00 pm
Location
Virtual via Zoom
Speaker
Audience
Public / Open To All
Event Description

Ancient Egyptian art is full of bodies, a fact that has not been lost on modern Western audiences who have long delighted in mummies, reliefs of kings “walking like an Egyptian”, and the miniature proportions of shabti figurines, workers for the afterlife who were included by the hundred in tombs.

This talk will argue that the bodily preoccupation of ancient Egyptian art is one reason why it has proven unusually appealing to modern audiences; we have until now, however, received Egyptian art through the lens of our own bodily understandings, which has led to problematic scholarly interpretations that sometimes unconsciously reproduce the modern body politics of racist, sexist, and colonial modes of thought.

This talk will examine several case studies of the modern “translation” of bodies in ancient Egyptian art and demonstrate how the nexus between ancient and modern body worlds continues to affect our understanding of Egyptian artistic production.

Event Type
Lecture

 

Any individual, including visitors to campus, who requires an accommodation should contact Dionne Worthy (dworthy@princeton.edu) at least one week in advance of the event.