2021-2022 Faculty-Graduate Seminar: “Plantation Effects” ft. Jasmine Togo-Brisby and Imelda Miller

Date
Dec 7, 2021, 4:30 pm6:00 pm
Location
Virtual
Speakers
Audience
  • Faculty & Staff
  • Graduate Students
  • Alumni
Event Description

Plantation Effects: Visual Ecologies of Race, Place and Labor

This seminar examines the multiple iterations of the plantation, and to draw from Katherine McKittrick, the kinds of futures it brings forth for us now. The plantation might be, to paraphrase Krista Thompson and Huey Copeland an “afrotrope” – a “recurrent visual form” that has played a key role in the formation of Black Diaspora identity and culture. We will consider its various representational formats, along with its various lives, and afterlives. As an ecological, material and economic intervention in the landscape, the plantations is a site of labor and knowledge production. It is both a form of enclosure and an extremely mobile form, a space where human and commodity flows converged, and an ecology formed through interspecies interaction. By considering these histories of the plantation – an ideological and spatial apparatus – we will think through its implications for practices of labor, experiences of the natural world, the organization of vision and, constructions of freedom as they have been formulated in African American Studies. Furthermore, across the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans, the plantation remains a site where alternative constructions of freedom, and otherworldly economies of knowledge, resilience and resistance formed. We will also consider how the transformations wrought by the plantation across the globe create possibilities to imagine the intimacies and particularities of time and space differently that can help us better understand the politics of race, representation and labor in our contemporary moment. Invited presenters for this seminar include scholars, writers and artists working in the fields, and intersecting geographies of Art History, History, Literary Studies, African American Studies, Creative Writing, Anthropology, Geography and the Environmental Humanities.

Please note that incoming and advanced graduate students are welcome to register.

 

About The Speakers

 

jasmine togo-brisby

Jasmine Togo-Brisby

Jasmine Togo-Brisby is a fourth-generation Australian South Sea Islander, whose great-great-grandparents were taken from Vanuatu as children and put to work on an Australian sugarcane plantation. Togo-Brisby's research examines the historical practice of 'blackbirding', a romanticised colloquialism for the Pacific slave trade, and its contemporary legacy and impact upon those who trace their roots to New Zealand and Australia through the slave-diaspora. Based in Wellington, Togo-Brisby is one of the few artists delving into the cultural memory and shared histories of plantation colonisation across the Pacific, her practice encompassing painting, early photographic techniques and processes, and sculpture.

 

 

Imelda Miller

imelda miller

Imelda Miller's principal area of interest is the history of past, present and future of South Sea Islander labour in Queensland. She started this work when in 2000 when she assisted with the research and development behind touring exhibition 'Refined White'. This project followed the history of about 62,000 people, predominantly from the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, who were transported to Queensland between 1863 and 1904 as labour for the Queensland sugar industry. Her more recent achievements in 2013 include playing a major leading role in the Cultural Precinct Initiative collaboration, Memories of a Forgotten People: 150 years of Australian South Sea Islander Contributions to Queensland.

 

For more information, please contact:

 


The Seminar is not open to the public and only for Princeton University faculty, students and staff.

Please RSVP to Shelby Sinclair, shelbys@princeton.edu

 

Event Type
Faculty-Graduate Seminar
Event Category
AAS Events