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Asian American History (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 270 / AMS 370

This course introduces students to the multiple and varied experiences of people of Asian heritage in the United States from the 19th century to the present day. It focuses on three major questions: (1) What brought Asians to the United States? (2) How did Asian Americans come to be viewed as a race? (3) How does Asian American experience transform our understanding of U.S. history? Using newspapers, novels, government reports, and films, this course will cover major topics in Asian American history, including Chinese Exclusion, Japanese internment, transnational adoption, and the model minority stereotype.

Instructors
Olivier M. Burtin
Beth Lew-Williams
Fall 2017
Becoming Latino in the U.S. (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 306 / LAO 306 / LAS 326

History 306 studies all Latinos in the US, from those who have (im)migrated from across Latin America to those who lived in what became US lands. The course covers the historical origins of debates over land ownership, the border, assimilation expectations, discrimination, immigration regulation, intergroup differences, civil rights activism, and labor disputes. History 306 looks transnationally at Latin America's history by exploring shifts in US public opinion and domestic policies. By the end of the course, students will have a greater understanding and appreciation of how Latinos became an identifiable group in the US.

Instructors
Rosina A. Lozano
Spring 2020
Precolonial Africa (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 314 / AFS 313

The course explores the rich history of the African continent before colonial occupation during the 19th century. It concentrates on people and civilizations indigenous to Africa, focusing on ancient civilizations as well as on the expanse of Islam and the Atlantic slave trade. Travelers' accounts, epics, and archaeological evidence reveal diversity of African culture.

Instructors
Emmanuel H. Kreike
Fall 2017
Colonial and Postcolonial Africa (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 315 / AFS 316

This course is an examination of the major political and economic trends in twentieth-century African history. It offers an interpretation of modern African history and the sources of its present predicament. In particular, we study the foundations of the colonial state, the legacy of the late colonial state (the period before independence), the rise and problems of resistance and nationalism, the immediate challenges of the independent states (such as bureaucracy and democracy), the more recent crises (such as debt and civil wars) on the continent, and the latest attempts to address these challenges from within the continent.

Instructors
Jacob S. Dlamini
Spring 2020
South African History, 1497 to the Present (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 316

South Africa's past and present were and are closely intertwined with those of its neighbors, including Angola, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique. South Africa's industrial expansion, for example, relied on thousands of migrant laborers from its neighbors. The course will highlight a variety of themes, including the rise and fall of African empires (Great Zimbabwe and the Zulu kingdom), the effects of European colonization, and the repression caused by the Apartheid system. The course will also focus on the dramatic political changes that occurred in the 1990s, including the end of the wars in the region and the rise of democracy.

Instructors
Emmanuel H. Kreike
Fall 2018
GRE
Modern Brazilian History (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 333 / LAS 373 / AAS 335

This course examines the history of modern Brazil from its independence in the 1820s to the present day. The lectures, readings, and discussions chart conflict, change, and continuity within Brazilian society, highlighting the role played by disenfranchised social actors in shaping the country's history. Topics include the meanings of political citizenship; slavery and abolition; race relations; indigenous populations; uneven economic development as well as Brazil's experiences with authoritarianism and globalization.

Instructors
Isadora M. Mota
Spring 2021
Modern Brazilian History (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 333 / LAS 373 / AAS 335

This course examines the history of modern Brazil from the late colonial period to the present. Lectures, readings, and discussions challenge prevailing narratives about modernity to highlight instead the role played by indigenous and African descendants in shaping Brazilian society. Topics include the meanings of political citizenship; slavery and abolition; race relations; indigenous rights; uneven economic development and Brazil's experiences with authoritarianism and globalization.

Instructors
Isadora M. Mota
Fall 2022
The American Civil War and Reconstruction (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 376

Why did the flourishing United States, by some measures the richest and most democratic nation of its era, fight the bloodiest civil war in the 19th century Western world? How did that war escalate into a revolutionary political struggle that transformed the nation--and then, almost as rapidly, give way to a reactionary backlash? This course will explore the causes, course, and consequences of the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction, keeping in mind the ways that America's greatest conflict also represented a major event in the history of the global 19th century, and a landmark moment in the making of the modern world.

Instructors
Matthew J. Karp
Fall 2020
Unrest and Renewal in Urban America (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HIS 388 / URB 388 / AMS 380 / AAS 388

This course surveys the history of cities in the United States from colonial settlement to the present. Over centuries, cities have symbolized democratic ideals of "melting pots" and cutting-edge innovation, as well as urban crises of disorder, decline, crime, and poverty. Urban life has concentrated extremes like rich and poor; racial and ethnic divides; philanthropy and greed; skyscrapers and parks; violence and hope; downtown and suburb. The course examines how cities in U.S. history have brokered revolution, transformation and renewal, focusing on class, race, gender, immigration, capitalism, and the built environment.

Instructors
Alison E. Isenberg
Fall 2022
AACL
Unrest and Renewal in Urban America (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HIS 388 / URB 388 / AMS 380 / AAS 388

This course surveys the history of cities in the United States from colonial settlement to the present. Over centuries, cities have symbolized democratic ideals of "melting pots" and cutting-edge innovation, as well as urban crises of disorder, decline, crime, and poverty. Urban life has concentrated extremes like rich and poor; racial and ethnic divides; philanthropy and greed; skyscrapers and parks; violence and hope; downtown and suburb. The course examines how cities in U.S. history have brokered revolution, transformation and renewal, focusing on class, race, gender, immigration, capitalism, and the built environment.

Instructors
Alison E. Isenberg
Fall 2021
RPP
Race, Drugs, and Drug Policy in America (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 393 / AAS 393 / SPI 389

From "Chinese opium" to Oxycontin, and from cocaine and "crack" to BiDil, drug controversies reflect enduring debates about the role of medicine, the law, the policing of ethnic identity, and racial difference. This course explores the history of controversial substances (prescription medicines, over-the-counter products, black market substances, psychoactive drugs), and how, from cigarettes to alcohol and opium, they become vehicles for heated debates over immigration, identity, cultural and biological difference, criminal character, the line between legality and illegality, and the boundaries of the normal and the pathological.

Instructors
Keith A. Wailoo
Spring 2022
AACL
Princeton and Slavery (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 402 / AAS 402 / AMS 412

Research seminar focused on Princeton University's historical connections to the institution of slavery. The class will contribute to a website that details this history and assist with the scholarly events related to the public launch of the Princeton and Slavery Project. Class will meet in Mudd Library.

Instructors
Martha A. Sandweiss
Fall 2017
GRE
Africa: Revolutionary Movements and Liberation Struggles (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 423 / AAS 423 / AFS 423

At the tip of every political activist's tongue in the twentieth century was a word: Revolution. African activists did not lag behind in this age of revolution. These African activists saw their political projects as part of a global revolutionary wave to uproot the old world and bring about a new socio-political dispensation- chief among them: the liberation of their countries from colonial domination. This course explores the social roots of Africa's revolutionary movements and the liberation struggles that were carried out between the 1950s and 1970s.

Instructors
Benedito L. Machava
Fall 2019
AACL
GRE
Black Worldmaking: Freedom Movements Then and Now (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HIS 443 / AAS 443

This course explores the continuities and ruptures, the striking similarities and the radical differences between Black freedom struggles from the 1960s to the present. Putting #BlackLivesMatter and the Movement for Black Lives in historical context, the course considers the history and legacy of the civil rights, Black Power, and anti-apartheid movements. In thinking about freedom movements past and present, we will pay particular attention to questions of philosophy, strategy, leadership, organization, and coalition building.

Instructors
Joshua B. Guild
Fall 2020
AACL
New Orleans at 300: Invention & Reinvention in an American City (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 456 / AAS 456 / URB 456 / HUM 456

As it commemorates its tercentennial, this course explores the history of what has been described as an "impossible but inevitable city" over three centuries. Settled on perpetually shifting swampland at the foot of one of the world's great waterways, this port city served as an outpost of three empires and a gateway linking the N. American heartland with the Gulf Coast, Caribbean, and Atlantic World. From European and African settlement through the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, we will consider how race, culture, and the environment have defined the history of the city and its people.

Instructors
Joshua B. Guild
Spring 2018
RPP
The History of Incarceration in the U.S. (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 459 / GSS 459 / AMS 459

The prison is a growth industry in the U.S.; it is also a central institution in U.S. political and social life, shaping our experience of race, class, gender, sexuality, citizenship, and political possibility. This course explores the history of incarceration over the course of more than two centuries. It tracks the emergence of the penitentiary in the early national period and investigates mass incarceration of the late 20th century. Topics include the relationship between the penitentiary and slavery; the prisoners' rights movement; Japanese internment; immigration detention; and the privatization and globalization of prisons.

Instructors
Wendy Warren
Spring 2021
RPP
The Political History of Civil Rights (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 471

This seminar will examine the origins, evolution and accomplishments of the civil rights movement, with special attention to the political context and consequences at every stage of its development.

Instructors
Kevin M. Kruse
Spring 2022
GRE
White Hunters, Black Poachers: Africa and the Science of Conservation (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 473 / AFS 472 / ENV 473

This course examines the role of Africa in the advent of the science of conservation. The course looks at the complex ways in which the origins of conservation were shaped by racialized ideas about humans and the relationship between culture and nature, as well by asymmetrical power relations. Readings include autobiographies and government reports. Students will consider the potentially taboo question of whether Africa needs conservation.

Instructors
Jacob S. Dlamini
Spring 2021
RPP
Race in the American Empire (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 483 / AAS 483 / AMS 483

This seminar takes a comparative, relational, and intersectional approach to the history of race in the American Empire. We will begin with two structuring contexts: European colonialism and transatlantic slavery. Over the semester, we will travel from the Atlantic Coast to Puerto Rico, the Lumbee Nation in North Carolina, Hawaii, and the Philippines. We will end in Ferguson, Missouri; Oak Creek, Wisconsin; and at the U.S. - Mexico border. Course readings draw from a range of fields and engage diverse histories to examine the pervasiveness of race in the United States. Themes include labor, migration, violence, science, law, and resistance.

Instructors
Bernadette J. Perez
Fall 2019
AACL
History of African American Families (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 485 / AAS 409

This course covers the history of African-American families. It traces the development of family life, meanings, values, and institutions from the period of slavery up to recent times. The course engages long-standing and current debates about black families in the scholarship across disciplines and in the society at large. The course will look at the diversity of black family arrangements and the way these have changed over time and adapted to internal and external challenges and demands. It will also situate the history of black families within a broader cross-cultural context.

Instructors
Tera W. Hunter
Fall 2018
Law, Social Difference, and the Sustenance of Health (SA)
Subject associations
HIS 488 / GHP 488 / AAS 488 / GSS 488

The tumult of the Affordable Care and Patient Protection Act, or "Obamacare," revealed anew the uncertainty of the healthcare social safety net. Efforts like Obamacare, however, emblematize the U.S. welfare state's incremental expansion. While high-technology and pharmaceuticals mark a celebratory facet of U.S. healthcare, another side is riven by social differences rooted in racism. The politics of citizenship, class, (dis)ability, gender, illness, sexuality, and taxation also form social difference's edifice. This course asks how social difference in statutory and case law codified inequality and stratified the means to preserve health.

Instructors
George J. Aumoithe
Fall 2019
GRE
RPP
Utopias of Yesteryear: Socialist Experiments in Africa (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 492 / AFS 492 / AAS 492

This seminar explores the contours of Africa's embrace and engagement with the most influential ideology of the twentieth-century. Why, and through which channels, were Africans attracted to socialism? Did particular forms of colonialism and decolonization push African political actors in that direction? Is it legitimate, as some scholars have suggested, to speak of genuinely African socialisms? We will discuss the contexts in which specific countries adopted and implemented socialism. Our goal is to place Africa in the mainstream of conversations about socialism.

Instructors
Benedito L. Machava
Spring 2020
Readings in African American History
Subject associations
HIS 577 / AAS 577

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the literature of African-American History, from the colonial era up to more recent times. Major themes and debates are highlighted. The course should help students to define interests within the field to pursue further study and research and also to aid preparation for examinations.

Instructors
Tera W. Hunter
Fall 2022
Readings in African American History
Subject associations
HIS 577 / AAS 577

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the literature of African-American History, from the colonial era up to more recent times. Major themes and debates are highlighted. The course should help students to define interests within the field to pursue further study and research and also to aid preparation for examinations.

Instructors
Tera W. Hunter
Fall 2020
Topics in African Diaspora History: Emancipation, Migration, Decolonization
Subject associations
HIS 578 / AAS 578

This readings course considers the dispersals, political movements, cultural production, social bonds, and intellectual labors that together have constituted and continually re-configured the modern African diaspora, from the emergence and collapse of the Atlantic slave system through the late twentieth century. The course tracks the evolution of diaspora as an idea and analytical framework, highlighting its intersections with concepts of Pan-Africanism, black nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and citizenship.

Instructors
Joshua B. Guild
Fall 2021
Camp/Prison/Border (LA)
Subject associations
HUM 310 / COM 371 / URB 311 / ARC 330

From the 19th century colonial era to the current border/migration crisis, camps and prisons have managed surplus and racialized populations through zones of confinement and exception. It is literature, and particularly the novel, that provides the compelling encounters with questions of confinement and movement. This course approaches the "border crisis" through a combination of readings in political theory/history and global literature, situating it in the longer history of population management and equipping students with the methodological tools for thinking about it across the social sciences/humanities divide.

Instructors
Nasser Abourahme
Fall 2018
AACL
Excavate/Illuminate: Creating Theater from the Raw Material of History (HA or LA)
Subject associations
HUM 321 / THR 362 / AMS 331 / AAS 324

Excavate/Illuminate will guide students' archival research and collaborative exploration of US history, journalism, and performance, focusing on the pivotal Tulsa Race Massacre (1921) as a case study. We will read several examples of documentary theater to see how artists create theater from the raw materials of history. For the first half of the semester, students will work in small groups, exploring online resources in order to develop and perform original scripts in the style of Federal Theatre Project Living Newspapers. During weeks 7-12, students will select collaborators and historical topics of interest to devise final performances.

Instructors
Arminda F. Thomas
Catherine M. Young
Spring 2022
AACL
RPP
Arts in the Invisible City: Race, Policy, Performance (CD or LA)
Subject associations
HUM 352 / ENG 252 / URB 352 / THR 360

This course will study the role that the arts can and do play in Trenton: a so-called invisible city, one of the poorest parts of the state, but intimately connected to Princeton. Examining the historical and contemporary racisms that have shaped Trenton, we will hear from activists, policy makers, artistic directors, politicians, and artists. Readings will include texts about urban invisibility, race, community theater, and public arts policy. The course will follow the development of a new play by Trenton's Passage Theater about desegregation in Trenton; students can also choose to assist in curating a show featuring Trenton artists.

Instructors
Nyssa Chow
D. Vance Smith
Spring 2022
The Media in America: Black Women and the 2020 Election (SA)
Subject associations
JRN 260 / GSS 260

This seminar will focus on black women and the roles--voter, organizer, influencer, candidate--they have played and will play in the national conversation and upcoming U.S. presidential election. We will also explore why and how the press can and should better report on the political priorities of this consequential constituency. Students will learn about the roots of the political journey of black women in America, including the pioneering journalists who first wrote on this subject, while acquiring the skills, perspective, and context to cover news at the intersection of race, gender, and politics today.

Instructors
Errin H. Whack
Fall 2019
RPP
The Media and Social Issues: Reporting on Policing, Race and Inequality (SA)
Subject associations
JRN 448 / AAS 448

Reporting on issues of policing, race and inequality in society today is critically important, but the challenges that reporters face in doing so are very real. How do journalists drop into neighborhoods they know little about, or write about topics of which they have no firsthand knowledge? What happens when their lived experiences add depth and texture to a story, but draw critiques of bias? In this seminar, students will examine how journalists cover difficult social issues playing out in the news through four emphases: sourcing, reporting, writing and presentation. The class will produce original journalism that adds to the discourse.

Instructors
Kimbriell R. Kelly
Spring 2021
GRE
RPP
Locked Up in the Americas: A History of Prisons and Detainment (SA)
Subject associations
LAS 313 / LAO 313 / AAS 331

This course explores the history of incarceration, detention centers, and internment camps in the Americas from the 1800s to the present. It addresses a range of issues, including political suppression, inmate labor, immigration, and the architectures of confinement, to show how penal colonies, convict transport, exile, and international policing have been evolving endeavors of state and social control since independence. We will look at a series of case studies, from detainment on the US-Mexico border and a panopticon in Cuba to the famed escapes at Devil's Island and the Chilean penal island that inspired the story of Robinson Crusoe.

Instructors
Ryan C. Edwards
Spring 2019
GRE
Race and Nation in Modern Latin America (CD or HA)
Subject associations
LAS 318 / HIS 319 / AAS 343

This course grapples with changing understandings of race in Latin America from the early 19th century to the present, and explores the persistent tension between nation-building projects and the region's remarkable human diversity. Latin America's history, like that of the US, has been profoundly shaped by the violent legacies of conquest and slavery. Yet the categories through which Latin Americans imagine racial difference have tended to shift over time and with them, the forms taken by racism and discrimination. We will set these evolving concepts in their historical context, the better to understand their concrete and enduring effects.

Instructors
Tony Wood
Spring 2022
GRE
Cuban History, Politics and Culture (SA)
Subject associations
LAS 371 / SPA 372 / AAS 374

This seminar constitutes an introduction to the study of Cuba from a historical perspective. During the first half of the semester the course follows a chronological approach, covering the political and socioeconomic development of the country from the sixteenth century to the present. In the second half of the semester, it examines a series of sociocultural issues that are central to the life of contemporary Cubans, on the island and abroad. At the core of the class lies an interrogation of the relevance of the Cuban case for larger discussions on colonialism, modernity, socialism and development.

Instructors
Adrian Lopez-Denis
Fall 2017
GRE
Caribbean Revolutions: From Plantation Slavery to Global Tourism (HA)
Subject associations
LAS 395 / AAS 396

The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the history of the Caribbean from the arrival of its first human inhabitants to the present. During the first half of the semester we will examine the dual role of plantation slavery and European colonialism in the historical development of the region up until the opening of the Panama Canal. On the second half we will discuss how the Caribbean interacted with the United States and the world at large during the long Twentieth Century.

Instructors
Adrian Lopez-Denis
Spring 2018
AACL
The Lucid Black and Proud Musicology of Leroi Jones/Amiri Baraka (LA)
Subject associations
LCA 213 / AAS 213 / ENG 213 / HUM 213

This class will focus on the career-long writing about jazz, blues, rock and R&B of Amiri Baraka (nee Leroi Jones) and the significant impact it has had on cultural politics, scholarship and esthetics from the early 1960s to the present. Baraka's work as an activist and his gifts as a poet/novelist/playwright/political essayist allowed him to inject considerable lyricism, eloquence, learning and passion into the previously moribund fields of African American music history and journalism. His music writing also affected the tenor of future public advocacy for jazz via the NEA 's Jazz Masters awards and Jazz At Lincoln Center.

Instructors
Gregory S. Tate
Fall 2017
Languages of Africa (CD or EC)
Subject associations
LIN 260 / AFS 262

About 2000 of the world's 6000 to 7000 languages are spoken in Africa. The diversity that characterizes these languages is exceptional, but very little is known to non-specialists. In this course, we will learn about the languages of Africa: the diversity of their linguistic structures (including famous features that are found nowhere else, e.g. click consonants), their history and the history of their speakers (from ca 10,000 BP to the (post) colonial period), and their cultural contexts, among other topics. This course has no prerequisites, and is open to anyone with an interest in African languages or the African continent.

Instructors
John T. Merrill
Fall 2021
AACL
Projects in Vocal Performance: Vocal Styles in African American Music (LA)
Subject associations
MPP 214 / AAS 214

This course will study African American composers and vocal musical styles from post-Civil War to the present. Includes a survey of the origins of spirituals, blues, art song, jazz, gospel and R&B, exploring the vocal styles, vocal production, repertoire, and cultural context of each genre. Course will involve both lecture and performance, culminating in a written project and public vocal performance. Non-singers are welcome.

Instructors
Rochelle K. Ellis
Trineice Robinson-Martin
Spring 2020
AACL
Improvisation and Interpretation in African American Folk-Based Music (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 212

Whether through work songs, field hollers, spirituals, ragtime, blues, jazz, soul music, or gospel music, the African American folk music tradition is a distinct reflection of the African American experience throughout the history of America. It is the individualized approach to storytelling, the societal and cultural influences upon the artist, and the function of the music for both the artist and community that has cultivated a legacy of core musical elements, values, and performance practice that exist within these diverse styles. This course will explore these characteristics through historical inquiry and practical application.

Instructors
Trineice Robinson-Martin
Spring 2021
Projects in African Dance Drumming (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 246

A performance course in African dance drumming with a focus on West African Dundun drumming and dance. Taught by composer and master drummer Olivier Tarpaga, the course provides hands-on experience on Manding and Afrobeat rhythms. Students will acquire performance experience, skills and techniques on the Kenkeni, Sangban and Dundumba drums. Students will develop an appreciation of the rhythmic physicality of dundun drumming in West African societies.

Instructors
Olivier P. Tarpaga
Fall 2021
Music of Africa (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 258 / AFS 258

Introduction to the vocal and instrumental music of Africa, south of the Sahara. Topics include the place of music in society, the influence of language on musical composition, principles of rhythmic organization, urban popular music, and "art" music as a response to colonialism.

Instructors
V. Kofi Agawu
Fall 2018
GRE
Projects in West African Mande Drumming (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 259

Performance course in West African drumming with focus on music from Mandé Empire (Mali, Guinea, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Guinea Bissau and Senegal.) Taught by master drummer and exponent of Mogo Kele Foli drumming technique. Course provides hands-on experience on two instruments, Djembe and Dun dun. Students acquire performance experience, skills and techniques on Wassolon and Diansa, and develop appreciation for integrity of drumming in daily life of West Africa.

Instructors
Olivier P. Tarpaga
Spring 2022
AACL
Jazz History: Many Sounds, Many Voices (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 262 / AAS 262

This course will examine the musical, historical, and cultural aspects of jazz throughout its entire history, looking at the 20th century as the breeding ground for jazz in America and beyond. During this more than one hundred year period, jazz morphed and fractured into many different styles and voices, all of which will be considered. In addition to the readings, the course will place an emphasis on listening to jazz recordings, and developing an analytical language to understand these recordings. A central goal is to understand where jazz was, is, and will be in the future, examining the musicians and the music that has kept jazz alive.

Instructors
Matthew Clayton
Spring 2022
Urban Blues and the Golden Age of Rock (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 264

Examines the origins and development of rock music in the period 1950-1975. The principal focus is on the songs, styles, and artists of the 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s. However, the course will also trace the roots of rock in American popular culture, reaching back to the 1920s, and it will conclude with a brief look at some of its later ramifications, up to the early 1980s. There will moreover be ample consideration of the cultural and political contexts in which the songs were created and heard.

Instructors
Sarah Town
Rob C. Wegman
Spring 2019
Studies in African Performance (LA)
Subject associations
MUS 350 / AFS 350 / ANT 373

This course presents a cross-disciplinary and multi-modal approach to African music, dance, and culture. Co-taught by a master drummer and choreographer (Tarpaga) and an ethnomusicologist (Steingo), students will explore African and African diasporic performance arts through readings, discussions, listening, film analysis, music performance, and composition.

Instructors
Gavin Steingo
Olivier P. Tarpaga
Fall 2019
Muslims, Jews and Christians in North Africa: Interactions, Conflicts and Memory (HA)
Subject associations
NES 316 / HIS 299 / AAS 324 / JDS 316

This has been as one of the main events of the modern times in North Africa: from the 1950s onwards, the Jewish local communities and the European settlers started to leave Libya, Tunisia, Morocco and Algeria. We will study the various interactions between Muslims, Jews and Christians in this part of the Islamic world. How did Europeans transform North African Islam and local societies? We will as well explore the reasons why the local Jews and Europeans left en masse after the colonial period and how North African Muslims, Jews and former European settlers developed either a strong memory of a shared past or a mutual distrust even today.

Instructors
M'hamed Oualdi
Fall 2019
Global Feminisms: Feminist Movements in the Middle East and Beyond (HA)
Subject associations
NES 374 / GSS 343

This course explores how feminist thought & activism circulates globally by examining a variety of feminist movements in the Middle East & North Africa. Beginning with modern feminist thought and activism in mid-19th century Syria & Egypt, we'll trace feminist movements in various contemporary contexts, from Morocco, Iran, Turkey, Tunisia, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon & Egypt in the 20th century, to women's participation in the Arab Spring and transnational Islamic movements in the 21st century. We'll map the local and geopolitical discourses that have shaped regional feminisms, and ask how local feminisms are transnational or global.

Instructors
Satyel Larson
Fall 2021
GRE
Human Trafficking and its Demise: African and European Slaves in Modern Islam (16th-21st century) (HA)
Subject associations
NES 395 / AFS 412 / AAS 412 / HIS 457

What did slavery represent for Islamic societies, and what does human trafficking mean in the Middle East and North Africa after Salafist groups such as ISIS restored practices of enslavement in Syria and Iraq? After a presentation of the issues related to slavery in Muslim societies today, we will ask ourselves if there was even such thing as Islamic slavery: Did Muslim societies organize a specific type of slave trade? To what extent was slavery a pivotal institution? We will see that various experiences of slavery shaped discourses about race and gender, and we will assess the main legacies of slavery in current Muslim societies.

Instructors
M'hamed Oualdi
Fall 2018
'Global Algeria' in the 20th Century: Beyond France and Fanon (CD or HA)
Subject associations
NES 397

From the mid to late 20th century, Algeria has occupied a key position in the imagination of major world actors such as the Black Panthers, Viet Cong and George W. Bush administration. Yet, observers have often examined the global significance of events in the North African nation, namely its storied revolution against France, while neglecting Algerians' lived experiences of these same moments. This class re-centers attention on different Algerian communities' views of histories concerning their country from the rise of nationalism in the early 20th century through the ongoing 2019 Hirak movement within local, regional, and global frameworks.

Instructors
Elizabeth M. Perego
Fall 2020
GRE
Human Trafficking and its Demise: African and European Slaves in Modern Islam (16th-21st century) (HA)
Subject associations
NES 411 / AFS 412 / AAS 412 / HIS 457

What did slavery represent for Islamic societies, and what does human trafficking mean in the Middle East and North Africa nowadays as Salafist groups such as ISIS restore practices of enslavement in Syria and Iraq? After a presentation of the issues related to slavery in Muslim societies today, we will ask ourselves if there was even such thing as Islamic slavery: Did Muslim societies organize a specific type of slave trade? To what extent was slavery a pivotal institution? We will see that various experiences of slavery shaped discourses about race and gender, and we will assess the main legacies of slavery in current Muslim societies.

Instructors
M'hamed Oualdi
Fall 2016
Race, Racism, and Racial Justice (CD or EM)
Subject associations
PHI 208 / AAS 209

Racism is a blight wherever it exists and calls for racial justice are still essential.This course aims to show how philosophy is integral to thinking through some major issues to do with race, racism, and racial justice today.In this course we will consider broad questions vital to understanding current racial issues.What is race? What is racism? How does intersectionality complicate our understanding of these questions? We will also consider more specific questions and particular issues around racial justice. Is racial profiling wrong? What should we think about affirmative action? Should there be reparations for (past?) racial injustices?

Instructors
Lidal Dror
Fall 2022