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AACL
Rhythm Tap Dance Lab: Explorations in Black Embodied and Electronic Music (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 303 / AAS 329 / MTD 303 / MUS 268

Enrolled students will engage with this course as workshop cast members of a new interdisciplinary piece by Princeton Arts Fellow Michael J. Love and explore methods of rhythm tap dance performance, live electronic music composition, and practice-based research on Black American music (genres such as jazz, funk, soul, hip hop, techno, and house). In-studio class meetings, structured as rehearsals, will be augmented with weekly listening, viewing, and reading assignments. There may also be opportunities for guest artists and respondents. The course will culminate in a work-in-progress showing during the final weeks of the semester.

Instructors
Michael J. Love
Spring 2022
AACL
Black Dance: History, Theory, Practice (CD or HA)
Subject associations
DAN 305 / AAS 307 / AMS 310

This course traces histories, traditions and innovations in Black American dance through archival and embodied practice. Moving from the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the 1970s, we will explore how dance - when executed by those who identify as Black and when circulated outside/beyond/without Black people themselves - speaks to the body's relationship to the political, social, and cultural contexts of American life. Through a hybrid seminar/studio seminar format, students will be introduced to theories, debates, and critical frameworks in Black Dance. We'll wrestle with the complexities around researching, doing, and reading Black Dance.

Instructors
Jasmine E. Johnson
Fall 2021
AACL
Special Topics In Urban Dance: Improvisational Approaches to Hip-Hop Practices (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 322 / AAS 312

This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of hip-hop dance, history and culture. We will explore the various dance styles and folk art traditions that preceded and influenced hip-hop dance and its essential elements. With a focus on Breaking and its deconstruction of body movements and choreographic forms, the course will emphasize the creative tools inherent in Breaking techniques and improvisational structures to support students to develop and find their own individual style. Viewings and readings videos will contextualize students' investigations.

Instructors
Raphael Xavier
Spring 2018
AACL
The Politics of Hip-Hop Dance (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 323 / AAS 308 / LAO 323

Hip-Hop is one of the most important cultural movements of the last half-century. But although hip-hop culture comprises a wide range of artistic practices - including music, dance, theater and graphic arts - its cultural politics are almost always analyzed through the lens of rap music. This seminar, by contrast, will explore the social and historical implications of hip-hop culture through its dance forms.

Instructors
Joseph Schloss
Spring 2020
AACL
Creating Your Biomythography Workshop (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 350 / AAS 329 / CWR 350

Coined by the poet and essayist Audre Lorde, the term "biomythography" combines history, biography, and myth-making. Using an interdisciplinary workshop approach to explore the concept of the biomyth, this course will provide an introduction to various sites of contemporary art practices situating literature, design, and dance within a social and historical context. Zami will serve as a point of departure into the creation of our memoir narratives. Additional texts will include live and recorded performances, historical, theoretical secondary sources, as well as guest writers, poets and artists.

Instructors
Jaamil Olawale Kosoko
Spring 2019
Economics of Development (SA)
Subject associations
ECO 351

This course is divided in two parts. The first examines why some countries are so much richer than others, and critically evaluates different explanations for this phenomenon on theoretical and empirical grounds. The second part deals with selected microeconomic issues related to life in the developing world, examining theories and data on education, health, credit and other topics.

Instructors
Matteo Bobba
Spring 2020
Melodrama: From Uncle Tom's Cabin to Grey's Anatomy (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 353 / GSS 424

From 18th-century fallen woman tales to 20th-century soap operas, melodrama has always offered exaggerated plot swings and wallowing emotions. Modern aesthetics often demands that writing be understated, that it show instead of tell; melodrama refuses to do these things. This course will examine a variety of sensational and emotive texts. Along the way we will consider distinctions between "high" and "low" art, we will examine morality tales about "good" and "bad" women, and we will interrogate the racial politics of sympathy.

Instructors
Jocelyn A. Rodal
Fall 2020
Black Dramatists in the English-Speaking World (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 354 / AAS 354 / THR 351

The language of a play intermingles thought and dramatic action to epitomize an unreconciled social conflict, intended to manifest within and between human bodies in real time. What have English-language dramatists of African descent identified as the central conflicts of their plays? How have their relationships to race, power, and colonial structures influenced their works? In what ways have they shaped, subverted, and advanced theatrical forms? This course will survey plays written by Black playwrights in the 20th and 21st C. We will explore dramatic works of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Instructors
Nathan A. Davis
Fall 2022
GRE
Black Dramatists in the English-Speaking World (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 354 / AAS 354 / THR 351

The language of a play intermingles thought and dramatic action to epitomize an unreconciled social conflict, intended to manifest within and between human bodies in real time. What have English-language dramatists of African descent identified as the central conflicts of their plays? How have their relationships to race, power, and colonial structures influenced their works? In what ways have they shaped, subverted, and advanced theatrical forms? This course will survey plays written by Black playwrights in the 20th and 21st C. We will explore dramatic works of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Instructors
Nathan A. Davis
Spring 2022
AACL
GRE
Reading Islands: Caribbean Waters, the Archipelago, and its Narratives (CD or LA)
Subject associations
ENG 358 / LAS 385 / AMS 396

The Caribbean is an archipelago made up of islands that both link and separate the Americas - islands that have weathered various waves of colonization, migration, and revolution. How do narratives of the Caribbean represent the collision of political forces and natural environments? Looking to the many abyssal histories of the Caribbean, we will explore questions of indigeneity, colonial contact, iterations of enslavement, and the plantation matrix in literary texts. How do island-writers evoke gender and a poetics of relation that exceeds tourist desire and forceful extraction?

Instructors
Christina León
Spring 2021
AACL
GRE
RPP
Black Aesthetics: Art, Literature, and Politics in the African Diaspora (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 379 / AAS 379 / AMS 389 / ART 380

This course introduces students to black aesthetics as a historically grounded concept that stages questions of the social, cultural, political and philosophical meaning of blackness. We'll explore various 'flashpoints' during the 20th century where black art serves both as a site of contestation and a platform for interrogating topics of race, gender, sexuality, the body, objecthood, slavery and colonialism. We'll consider how various generations of black artists/intellectuals across the African diaspora turned to the aesthetic realm to imagine new political possibilities and generate different ways of seeing, feeling, sensing, and thinking.

Instructors
Nijah Cunningham
Fall 2017
AACL
Experimenting in Dark Times: 19th C African American Literature and Culture (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 391A / AAS 391

This interdisciplinary course explores the intersecting worlds of late 19th century African American literature, technology, aesthetics, and politics. Although this period is commonly theorized as the "Nadir," or "dark point," of Black life, it was in fact a moment of artistic and social experimentation, as black artists and intellectuals traversed a range of media to imagine new futures. We will investigate this overlooked cultural moment and develop an understanding of black experimental writing's roots. In design studio, students will design historically experimental urban projects around the text's investigated in the weekly seminar.

Instructors
V. Mitch McEwen
Autumn M. Womack
Spring 2018
GRE
New Diasporas: Black British Literature (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 397 / COM 348 / AAS 397

This is a course on the dynamic body of works produced by migrants and descendants of migrants from Africa and the Caribbean in Britain since the 1950s. How has the migrant experience transformed the British cultural landscape after the end of an empire? What does it mean to be British and Black? How have migrant writers created new aesthetic forms to respond to the meaning of postcolonial Britishness? How does writing function as a mode of imagining alternative spaces of belonging? Readings will range from the novels of migrant arrival in the 1950s and the works of Zadie Smith to "post-racial" novels by Helen Oyeyemi and Aminatta Forna.

Instructors
Simon E. Gikandi
Spring 2020
Queer Literatures: Theory, Narrative, and Aesthetics (CD or LA)
Subject associations
ENG 408 / GSS 415 / AMS 418

This course will read from various trajectories of queer literature and engage "reading queerly" across race, gender, ability, class, and geography. We will consider the etymology of queer and think through its affiliate terms: lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans. How are such narratives encounters with power that are historically situated in relation to the national formations, carceral states, and racial capitalism?

Instructors
RL Goldberg
Christina León
Fall 2020
AACL
Major Author(s): August Wilson: African American Life in the 20th Century (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 411 / AAS 413 / AMS 411 / THR 412

August Wilson completed what many consider the most ambitious project of any American playwright. His cycle of ten plays, one for each decade, chronicles African American life in the 20th century. We will explore all ten plays as individual drama and depictions of history. We will read standard histories to gain background and context.

Instructors
R. N. Sandberg
Spring 2020
AACL
Major Author(s): Mourning America: Emerson and Douglass (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 411 / AMS 411 / AAS 413

This course focuses on the relations and differences between these two "representative men" of the 19th C. Demonstrating that Douglass' strategies of writing have relays with Emerson's points will enable us to bring out the radically political and historical character of Emerson's writings but also the profoundly literary elements of Douglass' political writings. Using the writings of these two key figures of the 19th C as a kind of measure, the course will seek to understand the governing cultural and political rhetorics through which America thought about such issues as race, slavery, manifest destiny, westward expansion, and identity.

Instructors
Eduardo L. Cadava
Fall 2020
AACL
Major Author(s): Toni Morrison and the Ethics of Reading (LA)
Subject associations
ENG 414 / AAS 455

This course traces the relationship between reading, politics, and aesthetics in the work of Toni Morrison. Working across her published oeuvre and personal archive -- from the "Bluest Eye" to "God Save the Child" -- we will approach Morrison as a critical reader, as a theorist of reading, and her novels as sites that interrogate reading practices. In tackling these goals, we will not only read works Morrison authored, but also works she edited (Gayle Jones' Corregidora), and collaborated on (The Black Book).

Instructors
Autumn M. Womack
Spring 2019
Topics in Literature and Ethics: Imagining Human Rights (EM)
Subject associations
ENG 415 / JRN 415 / COM 446

This course is an invitation for us to think about literature as an ethical and political project, one that raises enduring questions about the uniqueness of the human being, the relation of the self to the other, and the possibility of human understanding across cultural, ethnic, racial and national boundaries. Moving across different periods and traditions, the course will consider how literature, film, and photography have played a crucial role in establishing the meaning of human rights and of enriching our understanding of what it means to be a human being entitled to freedom, life, and liberty.

Instructors
Simon E. Gikandi
Fall 2020
African-American Literature: Africanfuturism
Subject associations
ENG 556 / AAS 556

"Out of Africa always something new," said Pliny the Elder. That might have been the first definition of Africanfuturism. But it also implies something that Africanfuturism fights against: the West's denial of Africa's rich history. Africanfuturism is speculative science fiction and art that reanimates African history and a future that is both prior to, and beyond, the ethnographic gaze, colonial "race science," European technocracy, and Western utopianism. The course tracks the emergence of Africanfuturism in literature from Amos Tutuola to Nnedi Okorafor, and in graphic novels, film, sculpture, collage, and political manifestos.

Instructors
D. Vance Smith
Spring 2022
African-American Literature: Reading Late 19th Century African American Literature Now
Subject associations
ENG 556 / AAS 558 / GSS 556 / HUM 556

What does it mean to read late-19th Century African American literature now? What critical questions does it answer, what methodological approaches does it demand, and what does it mean to ethically encounter the archive of postbellum black life and literature? We approach these questions by pairing deep readings of African American literature from the late 19th century with criticism that takes the period as its starting point. We read canonical and lesser known texts as sites from which race, freedom, aesthetics, performance, and the archive itself are being theorized, while also exploring how those very ideas might instruct us now.

Instructors
Autumn M. Womack
Spring 2021
African-American Literature: Sites of Memory: Black Archives in Theory and Practice
Subject associations
ENG 556 / AAS 556

Silences, blind spots, absences: institutional archives are often characterized by what they stifle, obscure, or lack. So what kind of work is done by Black archives, which do not take their institutional presence for granted and often take shape in extra-institutional sites? In this survey of Black archival thought, we identify the practices that writers, artists, and scholars have used to create their own sites of memory and meaning-making. Through discussion and Special Collections workshops, we investigate how Black archives urge a rethinking of our ethical, epistemological, and affective relations to historical and documentary evidence.

Instructors
Kinohi Nishikawa
Autumn M. Womack
Fall 2022
African-American Literature: James/Baldwin
Subject associations
ENG 556 / AAS 556

James Baldwin made no secret of the importance of Henry James to his creative life, paying debt in archly poetic sentences that friends as well as rivals snidely dismissed (Mailer: "even the best of his paragraphs are sprayed with perfume"). This course explores the erotic and political facets of style, its capacity to work as flamboyant closetedness and recipe or technique (Bronstein: "a way of training the reader into desire for and expectation of a particular kind of understanding"). J's theory of the novel's influence on B's essay style center our inquiry into how that stylistic cross-pollination might have informed black study.

Instructors
Stephen M. Best
Spring 2020
African-American Literature: Black Arts Criticism
Subject associations
ENG 556 / AAS 556

Black arts criticism addresses the contradictions of cultural production while expanding what it means to read a work of art. It's become an essential part of our contemporary discourse. From a longer view, this dissemination may be traced to the Black Arts movement, whose own body of criticism questioned just whom "black art" was being produced for. We survey the development of Black Arts criticism into Black arts criticism, touching on music, literature, and the visual arts. In the process, we explore criticism's role in the academy by learning how scholarly writing can inform online and magazine work.

Instructors
Kinohi Nishikawa
Fall 2019
Criticism and Theory: Frantz Fanon: Writing and Resistance
Subject associations
ENG 568 / AAS 568 / COM 589 / FRE 568 / MOD 568

Frantz Fanon is among the most important intellectuals of the twentieth century whose writings are critical in rethinking our world. In this course we read Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks and The Wretched of the Earth, plus essays in A Dying Colonialism and Toward the African Revolution. We read authors Fanon studied like Césaire, Capécia, Mannoni, Wright, Sartre, and Hegel, as well as recent scholars who interpret Fanon for our times like Ato Sekyi-Otu, Homi K. Bhabha, Achille Mbembe, Reiland Rabaka, Hamid Dabashi, Glen Coulthard, Anthony Alessandrini, and Gamal Abdel-Shehid and Zahir Kolia.

Instructors
Andrew Cole
Spring 2022
Problems in Literary Study: Black Modernisms
Subject associations
ENG 573 / COM 580 / AAS 573

A foundational moment in the history of European modernism in the twentieth century was the discovery of the world of Black others and the use of Blackness as a mechanism for maintaining and sustaining a new style of art. At about the same time, Black writers and artists adopted modernism as the aesthetic that would represent Black subjectivity in a world defined by racial violence. This course has two aims: to explore how black writers and artists in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean responded to high modernism's exoticism and to explore how they adopted and transformed the aesthetic ideology of global modernism.

Instructors
Simon E. Gikandi
Fall 2021
Literature and Society: The Present Moment: Contemporary Literature
Subject associations
ENG 574 / AAS 574

How do critics, writers, and readers approach the work of the present moment? This seminar has two main foci: first, the field of 21st century literature and culture in English, and second, the contemporary role of critique in both academic and popular culture. We read and watch primary texts that undertake their own projects of social, political, and formal critique, alongside experiments in critical and theoretical writing from writers both in and outside of the academy. We take up questions that animate discussions about the role of the humanities in our present moment: who are we writing for? What forms can that writing take?

Instructors
Sarah A. Chihaya
Kinohi Nishikawa
Fall 2017
Race in France (CD or SA)
Subject associations
FRE 334 / HUM 334 / ECS 344

This interdisciplinary course explores the topic of race in France, from the earliest populations to inhabit the land now called France to the multiracial communities that reside there today. Approached through a variety of fields (law, ethnography, biology, literature, philosophy, and political theory) students will study themes such as colonialism and immigration, scientific and juridical racism, anti-racist activism, and various racial imaginaries that mark the country's cultural production. Lecture in English with both English and French precepts.

Instructors
Christy N. Wampole
Fall 2020
Laughing with the Other: Humor and Alterity in French and Francophone Modern Literature and Culture (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 335 / COM 365 / ECS 347

From colonization to civil war, Francophone Africa and the Caribbean are little understood beyond such grave issues of urgency and violence. However, no society, its people or their realities are homogenously desolate. Through the study of novels, graphic novels, films and stand-up, this course explores the place of humor in French literature and culture of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. By the end of the seminar, students will have engaged with different forms of humor and will have acquired the skills to think critically about the capacity of humor in decolonizing French constructions of racial, gender and ethnic alterity.

Instructors
André Benhaïm
Sonali Ravi
Fall 2020
GRE
Haiti: History, Literature, and Arts of the First Black Republic (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 376 / AAS 378 / LAS 379

The readings and discussions will consider how the literature and arts of Haiti affirm, contest, and bear witness to historical narratives concerning the world's first black republic. The course will sample an array of historical accounts, novels, Afro-Caribbean religion (Vodun), plays, music, film, and visual arts of this unique postcolonial nation.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
Fall 2021
GRE
Haiti: History, Literature, and Arts of the First Black Republic (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 376 / AAS 378

This course will offer an overview of the history and culture of Haiti, the world's first black republic. In 1804, the former slaves of French St. Domingue under the leadership of Toussaint Louverture defeated the most powerful army in the world, Napoleon's to become the world's first post-slavery, black republic. The course will sample the rich history, novels, Afro-caribbean religion (Vodun), plays, music, film, and visual arts of this unique postcolonial nation.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
Fall 2016
Race in French Theater (CD or LA)
Subject associations
FRE 390 / THR 390

Race in French Theater will investigate the question of race and diversity on the French stages. We will study efforts made in recent years to diversify representations both on stage and in the audience, and examine the concrete steps taken by major institutions, subsidized national theaters, festivals, drama schools, and commercial theaters. We will compare similar current undertakings in the world of dance and at the Paris Opera, and broaden the scope of our inquiries by looking at representation and inclusion in French cinema. Theater artists will join us from France and share their experience creating in and for the present times.

Instructors
Florent Masse
Fall 2021
GRE
Topics in Francophone Literature, Culture, and History: Francophone Caribbean Literature (LA)
Subject associations
FRE 403 / LAS 423

An examination of the literature of the francophone Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the present. The course focuses on how literary creation, history and theoretical reflection united in this unique and compelling culture. Caribbean literature in French is the symbolic, imaginative expression of the peoples of the French-speaking regions of the Caribbean, including Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guyana, and their dependencies.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
Spring 2021
Marx in the Caribbean
Subject associations
FRE 504 / LAS 504 / AAS 503

The course examines Marx's critique of capitalist slavery and its refiguration in Caribbean critique. We discuss the writings of Toussaint Louverture, Henry Christophe, C.L.R. James, Eric Williams, Aimé Césaire, and Suzanne Césaire - key figures of the `Black Jacobin' tradition - as they develop original critiques of slavery, colonialism, and Antillean capitalism, these being understood as what Marx called the `social forms' (gesellschaftliche Formen) of labour and wealth.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
Spring 2022
Slavery and Capitalism
Subject associations
FRE 504 / LAS 504 / AAS 503

The course will examine the place of plantation slavery in the development of capitalist modernity. We will focus on two classic texts: Eric Williams' Capitalism and Slavery, and CLR James' history of the Haitian Revolution, The Black Jacobins. We will also discuss in this context Marx's critique of capitalist slavery in Capital, and its importance for the tradition of Caribbean critique. Also to be considered are the writings of Toussaint Louverture, Henry Christophe, and Aimé and Suzanne Césaire as they develop original critiques of slavery, colonialism, and Antillean capitalism.

Instructors
F. Nick Nesbitt
Fall 2022
Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory: Critical Race Theory and German Thought
Subject associations
GER 520 / AAS 520

In revisiting key junctures of German intellectual history in the light of critical race theory, this seminar has five goals: 1) to examine concepts of race in classical German thought (Kant, Herder, Hegel) and question their premises; 2) to study pseudo-scientific discourses on race in German colonialism and totalitarianism; 3) to engage with recent debates on the singularity of the Shoah vs. comparative genocide studies; 4) to read literary texts with an eye to symptomatic racializations; and 5) to explore how texts in contemporary Black studies engage with and critically transform German thought.

Instructors
Barbara N. Nagel
Johannes Wankhammer
Spring 2022
African Cities: Their Pasts and Futures (SA)
Subject associations
GLS 311 / AFS 311

Focusing on three Ghanaian cities--Accra, Cape Coast, and Kumasi--the seminar traces the development of these urban centers from the earliest times to the present and explores the cultural encounters that have given them distinct identities. Using theories from history and anthropology, literature and cultural studies, political economy and urban studies, the seminar explores central questions in the study of the urban experience. Based in Accra, students will immerse themselves in the life of the city, mapping its social and cultural geography, trying to understand the structures that define it.

Instructors
Simon E. Gikandi
Summer 2020
GRE
Japan and Black America: A Long Road of Discovery (SA)
Subject associations
GLS 331 / AAS 334

According to popular imagery there are hardly two cultures that are more different than those of the Japanese and Black Americans. And yet, despite these perceived differences, for over a century there has been abundant and complex cultural sharing, borrowing, and exchange between them. This interdisciplinary course will explore this tradition from the early 20th century to the present. In addition to investigating creative cultural pairings, we will explore vexing issues that frequently appear when people with distinct histories and traditions imagine each other.

Instructors
Imani Perry
Summer 2018
Visualizing Australia: Art, Land, Identity (LA)
Subject associations
GLS 334 / ART 390 / AAS 315

This seminar focuses on the representation of human and non-human relationships to the land as a site of meaning making, identity formation and cultural expression. The state's geography will form the backdrop to the course as we examine how the regions' communities-First National owners to contemporary immigrants-have encountered, related to and depicted their relations to place. We'll delve deeply into the layers embedded in art-making and draw out the different critical frameworks that have shaped Australian art. Representations of the landscape form the core course theme, and we will examine these sources using different approaches.

Instructors
Anna Arabindan Kesson
Summer 2020
AACL
Intersectional History of Sexual Violence (HA)
Subject associations
GSS 207 / AAS 207

This course explores the intellectual history of the intersections of race and sexual violence. We analyze the evolution of legal frameworks about sexual violence in different jurisdictions, while also exploring the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in the history of sexual violence in the Atlantic slave trade and contemporary carceral systems. Students will examine case studies of sexual violence against trans youth of color and the racialization of intimate partner sexual violence, genocidal rape, post-catastrophe sexual violence, and sex trafficking, including forced marriage and child sexual exploitation.

Instructors
Dannelle Gutarra Cordero
Spring 2020
AACL
Media, Sex, and the Racialized Body (SA)
Subject associations
GSS 208 / AAS 208

This course explores the intellectual history of media, sex, and the racialized body. We will analyze the representation of the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in film, advertisements, the fashion industry, reality TV, animation, and music videos. This course will also closely examine the predominance of White heteronormativity in film, the representation of gender in K-pop and K-dramas, and the sexualization of Blackness and Latinidad in Blaxploitation films and telenovelas.

Instructors
Dannelle Gutarra Cordero
Spring 2022
Media, Sex, and the Racialized Body (SA)
Subject associations
GSS 208 / AAS 208

This course explores the recent intellectual history of media, sex, and the racialized body. We will analyze the representation of the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in film, advertisements, the fashion industry, reality TV, animation, and music videos. This course will also closely examine the predominance of White heteronormativity in film, the representation of gender in K-pop and K-dramas, and the hypersexualization of Blackness and Latinidad in Blaxploitation films and telenovelas.

Instructors
Dannelle Gutarra Cordero
Fall 2022
GRE
The Racialization of Beauty (HA or SA)
Subject associations
GSS 218 / AAS 218

This course explores the intellectual history of the racialization of beauty. We will begin by analyzing how the history of Atlantic slavery and scientific racism set precedents for the contemporary dominant conceptualization of beauty in the body, art, and nature. Students will then concentrate on the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in beauty pageants, advertising, and the plastic surgery industry. This course will also closely examine racialized fat phobia, the racial politics of hair, transnational colorism, and racialized exploitation in beauty service work.

Instructors
Dannelle Gutarra Cordero
Spring 2022
The Racialization of Beauty (HA or SA)
Subject associations
GSS 218 / AAS 218

This course explores the intellectual history of the racialization of beauty. We will begin by analyzing how the history of Atlantic slavery and scientific racism set precedents for the contemporary dominant conceptualization of beauty in the body, art, and nature. Students will then concentrate on the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in beauty pageants, advertising, and the plastic surgery industry. This course will also closely examine racialized fat phobia, the racial politics of hair, transnational colorism, and racialized exploitation in beauty service work.

Instructors
Dannelle Gutarra Cordero
Fall 2022
GRE
Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Contemporary States of Unfreedom (SA)
Subject associations
GSS 219 / AAS 219

This course explores the recent history of ideas about contemporary unfreedom, focusing on the influence of discourses about race, gender, and sexuality. We will study how scientific racism and racial capitalism fuel contemporary slavery. Students will analyze how the silencing of the pervasiveness of contemporary slavery is tied to the narrative of "abolition" and the globalization of economic dynamics based on the exploitation of predominantly people of color. This course will also examine the racialization of child exploitation, survivor criminalization, and representation of unfreedom in anti-trafficking campaigns.

Instructors
Dannelle Gutarra Cordero
Spring 2022
Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Contemporary States of Unfreedom (SA)
Subject associations
GSS 219 / AAS 219

This course explores the recent history of ideas about contemporary unfreedom, focusing on the influence of discourses about race, gender, and sexuality. We will study how scientific racism, structural violence, and climate change fuel contemporary slavery. Students will analyze how the silencing of the pervasiveness of contemporary slavery is tied to the narrative of "abolition" and the globalization of economic dynamics based on the exploitation of predominantly people of color. This course will also examine the racialization of child exploitation, survivor criminalization, and representation of unfreedom in the annual U.S. TIP Report.

Instructors
Dannelle Gutarra Cordero
Fall 2022
AACL
Pleasure, Power and Profit: Race and Sexualities in a Global Era (EM)
Subject associations
GSS 345 / AAS 355 / AMS 373

Pleasure Power and Profit explores the intimate ways that sexualities and race are entwined in contemporary culture, historically, and in our own lives. Why are questions about sexuality and race some of the most controversial, compelling, yet often taboo issues of our time? Exploring films, popular culture, novels, social media, and theory, we engage themes like: race, gender and empire; fetishism, Barbie, vampires and zombies; sex work and pornography; marriage and monogamy; queer sexualities; and strategies for social empowerment such as: Black Lives Matter, the new campus feminism, and global movements against sexual and gender violence.

Instructors
Anne McClintock
Spring 2021
Gender and Sexuality in American Politics and Policy
Subject associations
GSS 502 / AAS 502 / POL 514

This course examines the ways in which gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by U.S. politics and public policy, emphasizing intersections with other categories, identities, and forms of marginalization including race, ethnicity, class, ideology, and partisan identification. We examine the history, approaches, and controversies in research about gender and sexuality in U.S. politics from a range of theoretical and methodological approaches. We also explore feminist, queer, and intersectional theories and methodologies, related work from other disciplines, and research that does not fit neatly into traditional disciplinary categories.

Instructors
Dara Z. Strolovitch
Fall 2020
Interest Groups and Social Movements in American Politics and Policy
Subject associations
GSS 543 / POL 543 / AAS 543 / AMS 543

This course engages theoretical and empirical work about interest groups and social movements in U.S. politics and policy-making. We examine theories of interest group and social movement formation, maintenance, and decline; how interest groups and social movements try to (& do) influence politics and public policy; interactions between interest groups and the three branches of the federal government; lobbying, elections, and campaign finance; and the effectiveness of interest groups and movements as agents of democratic representation, particularly for marginalized groups such as women, people of colour, low-income people, and LGBTQ people.

Instructors
Dara Z. Strolovitch
Spring 2021
AACL
The Sixties: Documentary, Youth and the City (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HIS 202 / URB 203 / AMS 202 / AAS 203

This seminar in history and documentary film explores personal narrative and how individual experience contributes to profound social change. We study 1960s youth through oral history, biography, memoir, ethnography and journalism. Trenton NJ is the case study. Themes include: civil rights & Black power; immigration & migration; student uprisings & policing; gender & sexuality; high school & college; churches & city institutions; sports & youth culture; labor, class & neighborhood; politics & government. Working with documentary narrative, the course asks how a new generation of storytellers will shape public conversations and policy.

Instructors
Purcell Carson
Alison E. Isenberg
Spring 2022
GRE
The Mother and Father Continent: A Global History of Africa (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HIS 250 / AFS 250

Africa is both the Mother and Father Continent: it gave birth to Humankind (as a biological species) and our African ancestors created Human history, Culture, and Civilization. Human and Global History developed literally for hundreds of thousands of years in Africa before it spread worldwide. The depth of Africa's history explains the continent's enormous diversity in terms of, for example, genetics and biodiversity and languages and cultures. Moreover, as the course demonstrates, Africa and its societies were never isolated from the rest of the world. Rather, the continent and its peoples remain very much at the center of global history.

Instructors
Emmanuel H. Kreike
Spring 2022