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Advanced Seminar in American Studies: American Empire, the Anthropocene, & Afrofuturism in Octavia E. Butler (CD or LA)
Subject associations
AMS 404 / AAS 405

This seminar takes up the works of science fiction pioneer Octavia E. Butler to explore the future of the American empire via a study of Afrofuturism and the Anthropocene. We will explore Afrofuturism's history and current status, especially in relation to the Anthropocene in the novels, short stories, and critical writings by and related to Butler's canon. We will pay close attention to how Butler's oeuvre charts the arc of American history from the Civil Rights Movement to the Iraq war and the significance of Butler's prophetic work that had dire warnings regarding climate change, white nationalism, and the waning of the American empire.

Fall 2022
RPP
Policing and Militarization Today (CD or SA)
Subject associations
ANT 223 / AMS 223 / AAS 224 / URB 224

This class aims to explore transnational issues in policing. Drawing heavily upon anthropological methods and theory, we aim neither to vindicate nor contest the police's right to use force (whether a particular instance was a violation of law), but instead, to contribute to the understanding of force (its forms, justifications, interpretations). The innovative transnational approach to policing developed during the semester will allow for a cross-cultural comparative analysis that explores larger rubrics of policing in a comprehensive social scientific framework. We hope that you are ready to explore these exciting and urgent issues with us.

Instructors
Aisha M. Beliso-De Jesús
Laurence Ralph
Spring 2021
#BlackLivesMatter (CD or SA)
Subject associations
ANT 244 / AAS 243

This seminar traces the historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement in the United States and comparative global contexts. The movement and course are committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies. The course seeks to document the forms of dispossession that Black Americans face, and offers a critical examination of the prison industrial complex, police brutality, urban poverty, and white supremacy in the US.

Instructors
Hanna Garth
Fall 2022
AACL
RPP
#BlackLivesMatter (CD or SA)
Subject associations
ANT 244 / AAS 243

This seminar traces the historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement in the United States and comparative global contexts. The movement and course are committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies. The course seeks to document the forms of dispossession that Black Americans face, and offers a critical examination of the prison industrial complex, police brutality, urban poverty, and white supremacy in the US.

Instructors
Hanna Garth
Fall 2021
The Ethnographer's Craft (SA)
Subject associations
ANT 301

This course introduces students to "doing" anthropology through the study and practice of fieldwork and helps them develop tools needed to define/design their own ethnographic research projects. We discuss and put into practice ethnographic techniques, exploring how ethnographers form their topics of study and deploy theoretical resources to develop research questions. We study different approaches to engaging with people, place and things in ethnographic fieldsites and examine social, political, epistemological and ethical dimensions of our research methods, our interpretations, and our representations of the cultures/subjects that we study.

Instructors
Ryo Morimoto
Spring 2019
Reckoning: Complicated Histories and Collective Identities (SA)
Subject associations
ANT 328 / AAS 396 / AMS 314 / ART 327

How do we grapple with complicated, violent, and disavowed aspects of our collective histories in contemporary society? This class takes as its central issue how societies chose (or not) to reckon with, redress, and repair their difficult pasts. This course will challenge students to take on the difficult work of grappling with violent and otherwise negative pasts through the cultural media of memorial, monument, museum, and collaborative heritage practice. See "Other Information" below about a possible Break Trip to a memorial to the victims of racial terrorism in the U.S. South, located in Montgomery, Alabama.

Instructors
Tiffany Cherelle Fryer
Fall 2021
RPP
Gangsters and Troublesome Populations (SA)
Subject associations
ANT 363 / AAS 369

Since the 1920s, the term "gang" has been used to describe all kinds of collectives, from groups of well-dressed mobsters to petty criminals and juvenile delinquents. In nearly a century of research the only consistency in their characterization is as internal Other from the vantage of the law. This class will investigate how the category of "the gang" serves to provoke imaginaries of racial unrest and discourses of "dangerous," threatening subjects in urban enclaves. More broadly we will examine the methods and means by which liberal democratic governments maintain their sovereign integrity through the containment of threatening populations.

Instructors
Laurence Ralph
Spring 2020
GRE
Reading Africa: Anthropological Approaches to the Continent (CD or SA)
Subject associations
ANT 369 / AFS 369

How are anthropologists writing about Africa today? What are their theoretical and thematic preoccupations? How do they stylistically represent the everyday lives of Africans? We will do a close reading of seven full-length ethnographies that chronicle the rich diversity of cultures on the continent. From the production of shea butter by indigenous women, to the crisis in Darfur, the hope and dreams of American Visa lottery winners, the bloody conflict between the international community and Somali pirates, we will read a wide range of ethnographies that challenge prevailing Western stereotypes about what life is really like on the continent.

Instructors
Christina T. Collins
Spring 2021
AACL
GRE
Making History: Museums, Monuments, and Cultural Heritage (HA)
Subject associations
ANT 379 / HUM 379 / AMS 379 / AAS 375

This course contends with how shared histories are collectively made and remade in contemporary society. We will interrogate the meaning of history, memory, heritage, and "the past." What is at stake in how we represent the past? What do we mean when we make a claim on history as "ours"? What role do museums, monuments, and memorials play in the formation and maintenance of collective identities? Can practices like public history and archaeology promote collective healing?

Instructors
Tiffany Cherelle Fryer
Spring 2020
AACL
Religion and Culture: Muslims in America (SA)
Subject associations
ANT 389 / AMS 339 / AAS 333

The course is an introduction to Muslim cultures in the US. We will read texts from anthropology, sociology, history and other fields to develop an understanding of the historical and present diversity of Muslim communities in America. The first half provides a survey of Muslim communities in this country from the 17th century onward. The second half is a thematic approach to various topics: 9/11, women and gender, religious conversion, interfaith relations, youth, mosques as institutions, and Islamophobia. In addition to scholarly materials, we will learn from multimedia sources (films, news, cartoons), visitors, and a visit to local mosque.

Instructors
Aly Kassam-Remtulla
Spring 2019
RPP
Race and Medicine (CD or EM)
Subject associations
ANT 403 / AAS 403 / GHP 403

Why do certain populations have longer life expectancies? Is it behavior, genes, structural inequalities? And why should the government care? This course unpacks taken-for-granted concepts like race, evidence-based medicine, and even the public health focus on equalizing life expectancies. From questions of racism in the clinic to citizenship and the Affordable Care Act, 'Race and Medicine' takes students on a journey of rethinking what constitutes social justice in health care.

Instructors
Carolyn M. Rouse
Spring 2021
GRE
Topics in Anthropology: Decolonization (HA or SA)
Subject associations
ANT 405 / AFS 405

Recent developments have seen a resurgence in the use of the term "decolonization." This course examines the significance of decolonization, beginning with the post-World War II conjuncture and following shifts and continuities in uses of the term both in social theory and by social and political movements. Rather than studying the process country-by-country, we explore decolonization through intellectual, social and political histories of Négritude, Arab existentialism and self-determination. The latter third of the course, we explore changes to the meaning of decolonization when reconceptualized beyond a specific conjuncture, period or age.

Instructors
Mark Drury
Spring 2021
Race, Gender, Empire (SA)
Subject associations
ANT 419 / AMS 417 / GSS 423 / LAS 419

How is empire made? How is it imagined and reimagined, mutating and creating new global relations? What are its social, political and material signatures? In this seminar we will explore how empire's derivative manifestations and entrenched mechanisms (e.g. race, gender or capitalism) influence our understandings of history and the structuring of our social relationships. Engaging transdisciplinary works we will focus on how empire constructs contradictory logics of belonging in localized contexts through the formation of intimate, biopolitical and ecological relationships between people, territories and collective institutions of governance.

Instructors
Tiffany Cherelle Fryer
Fall 2020
The Resource Curse and Development in Africa (SA)
Subject associations
ANT 421 / AFS 320

This course examines the relationship between natural resource wealth and development in Africa. The dominant discourse on resource wealth on the continent has largely been associated with the resource curse. The construction and reproduction of the resource curse thesis is explored, particularly against the backdrop of the recent resource boom and scramble on the continent, and the changes that have occurred in Africa's resource-rich economies. It seeks to address the following questions. Is resource endowment inimical to development in Africa? What causes the resource curse in Africa? How can the resource curse be overcome in Africa?

Instructors
Godwin N. Onuoha
Spring 2018
RPP
Disability, Difference, and Race (EM)
Subject associations
ANT 461 / AAS 364 / GHP 461 / GSS 461

While diseases are often imagined to be scientific or medical conditions, they are also social constructs. In the 19th century the condition of Dysaesthesia Aethiopis (an ailment that made its sufferers "mischievous") was considered nearly universal among free blacks. Today AIDS and tuberculosis are often associated with personal attributes, while the social forces at work to structure risk for acquiring these illnesses are glossed over. We will examine work from anthropologists, sociologists, historians, queer studies scholars and scientists who work on issues of disability to investigate how people challenge contemporary visions of society.

Instructors
Laurence Ralph
Spring 2020
Comparing the Urban in the Americas and South Asia (SA)
Subject associations
ARC 396 / SAS 396 / URB 396

This course bridges the gap between pedagogy on Western cities, and that on cities of the so-called Global South, to compare urbanization and social movements across the Americas and South Asia. Specific course units will examine the development of informal settlements, urban segregation, enclave urbanism, privatization of public spaces, evictions, gentrification, homelessness, and the criminalization of the urban poor. Attention will also be paid to social movements focused on the right to the city. It asks how these processes and phenomena are similar, different, and / or interconnected across contexts.

Instructors
Priti Narayan
Spring 2020
Theories of Housing and Urbanism (SA)
Subject associations
ARC 401 / URB 401

The seminar will explore theories of urbanism and housing by reading canonical writers who have created distinctive and influential ideas about urbanism and housing from the nineteenth century to the present. The writers are architects, planners, and social scientists. The theories are interdisciplinary. One or two major works will be discussed each week. We will critically evaluate their relevance and significance for architecture now. Topics include: modernism, technological futurism, density, the new urbanism, the networked city, landscape urbanism, and sustainable urbanism.

Instructors
Andrew M. Laing
Fall 2019
Space and Subjectivity: Reading Race through Architecture and the Built Environment
Subject associations
ARC 550 / AAS 550

This seminar focuses on identifying and articulating key concepts and themes concerning the interplay of race and the built environment. Proceeding initially from theories of subjectivity articulated by W.E.B. Du Bois, Michel Foucault, and Stuart Hall, the course analyzes culturations of the self via a theory of reflexive spatial practices that can help explain encounters between racialized forms of identity and the material conditions of architecture and cities.

Instructors
Jay Cephas
Spring 2022
Of Monkeys, Men and Great Edifices
Subject associations
ARC 553 / AAS 553

The seminar explores philosophical intersections of race and architecture, revealing Blackness as a negative aesthetic formation in historical and theoretical discourses. The transfiguration of Blackness from "inferior" historical racial sign to compelling architectonic language parallels John Dewey's formulations on rhetoric and "becoming." The result is a new spatial rhetoric founded on Blackness. Blackness is discussed as an aesthetic principle rather than a strictly socio-political condition. The distinction allows us to understand how race and architecture coexist.

Instructors
Darell Fields
Spring 2022
Microhistory: Toward an Architecture of Slavery
Subject associations
ARC 556 / AAS 557 / MOD 503

Microhistory is a specific methodological approach to the study and writing of history. It applies an extremely detailed scale of investigation to any object of inquiry, including a particular person, community, infrastructure, building, map, plan, law, protocol, record, and event. The seminar scrutinizes this methodology, challenges teleological narratives, and examines microhistories throughout the spatial history of slavery in the United States of America and in Princeton. The aim is to anchor untapped spaces in order to unravel macro historical tendencies.

Instructors
Samia Henni
Spring 2018
GRE
Introduction to African Art (CD or LA)
Subject associations
ART 260 / AAS 260 / AFS 260

An introduction to African art and architecture from prehistory to the 20th century. Beginning with Paleolithic rock art of northern and southern Africa, we will cover ancient Nubia and Meroe; Neolithic cultures such as Nok, Djenne and Ife; African kingdoms, including Benin, Asante, Bamun, Kongo, Kuba, Great Zimbabwe, and the Zulu; Christian Ethiopia and the Islamic Swahili coast; and other societies, such as the Sherbro, Igbo, and the Maasai. By combining Africa's cultural history and developments in artistic forms we establish a long historical view of the stunning diversity of the continent's indigenous arts and architecture.

Instructors
Chika O. Okeke-Agulu
Spring 2022
AACL
GRE
What is Black Art: Art History and the Black Diaspora (LA)
Subject associations
ART 373 / AAS 373

This course introduces students to the art and visual culture of the Black diaspora from the colonial period to the present. Artists and works of art will be considered in terms of their social, intellectual, and historical contexts and students will be encouraged to consider artistic practices as they intersect with other cultural spheres. Topics and readings will draw from the field of art history as well as from other areas of inquiry such as cultural studies, critical race theory, and the history of the Atlantic world, and the course will incorporate regular museum visits and dialogue with artists and curators in the field.

Instructors
Anna Arabindan Kesson
Fall 2019
GRE
Post-1945 African Photography (LA)
Subject associations
ART 378 / AFS 378 / AAS 377

This course examines the role and status of photography in different phases of Africa's political, cultural and art historical experience since 1945. We explore how African photographers used the photographic medium in the service of the state, society and their own artistic visions during the colonial and post-independence eras. Photography's relationship with art and its social function in Africa will underlie our discussion.

Instructors
Chika O. Okeke-Agulu
Fall 2021
GRE
Kongo Art (LA)
Subject associations
ART 473 / AAS 473 / AFS 473

Easily recognized as among the most important examples of canonical African art, Kongo sculpture, textiles, and ritual design are famous for their conceptual density, stylistic variety and rigorous abstraction. The course examines the role of art in the life of the Kongo Kingdom and related peoples, from the arrival of Spanish explorers and missionaries in the 15th century, through the era of Belgian colonization from the late 19th to mid-20th centuries, to the period since political independence in 1960. The seminar coincides with and will explore the Kongo Across the Waters exhibition at the Princeton University Museum.

Instructors
Chika O. Okeke-Agulu
Fall 2018
GRE
Art and Politics in Postcolonial Africa (LA)
Subject associations
ART 474 / AAS 474 / AFS 474

This seminar examines the impact of the International Monetary Fund's Structural Adjustment Program, military dictatorships, and political crises on artistic production in the 1980s, and the dramatic movement of African artists from the margins of the international art world to its very center since the 1990s. How familiar or different are the works and concerns of African artists? What are the consequences, in Africa and the West, of the international success of a few African artists? And what does the work of these Africans at home and in the West tell us about the sociopolitical conditions of our world today?

Instructors
Chika O. Okeke-Agulu
Fall 2019
GRE
Pathologies of Difference: Art, Medicine and Race in the British Empire (CD or EC)
Subject associations
ART 483 / AAS 483 / HUM 483

This course examines the relationship of art and medicine in the construction and production of race in the British Empire from the early modern period until the beginning of the twentieth century. We will analyze how image-making has been used in the development of medical knowledge and how scientific concepts of vision and natural history have been incorporated into art making. We will then examine how these intersections were deployed to visualize and, sometimes, challenge continually changing meanings about human and geographical difference across Britain and its colonies.

Instructors
Anna Arabindan Kesson
Spring 2022
Ancient Egyptian Kingship in Image, Architecture & Performance
Subject associations
ART 529 / CLA 528 / AAS 529

The institution of kingship was central to the ancient Egyptian worldview. Kings and their administrations sought to express the complex nature of a strong leader with access to the gods and secret knowledge, exceptional skill as a warrior and diplomat, and unrivaled power over and sacrifice to his people by using both mystery and overwhelming display. In this seminar we consider the nature of Egyptian kingship and how a vast body of material and visual culture shaped and expressed this essential concept from its origins in the beginning of the 4th millennium to the era of Roman rulers.

Instructors
Deborah A. Vischak
Fall 2019
Art and the British Empire
Subject associations
ART 560 / AAS 560

This seminar proceeds through a series of thematic and case studies ranging from Britain's early colonial expansion to the legacies of empire in contemporary art and museum practice. Topics include science and ethnography; the colonial picturesque; curiosity and collecting; slavery and visual representation; art and nationalism and readings are drawn from a range of disciplines.

Instructors
Anna Arabindan Kesson
Fall 2021
AACL
Black and Asian in America (SA)
Subject associations
ASA 360 / AAS 360 / ENG 285

Debates over policing, immigration, and affirmative action routinely position Black and Asian communities on opposing sides, while the model minority myth has been redeployed in the twenty-first century in the form of the Tiger Mom. How did we get here, and what do these trends mean for our daily lives? We respond to these questions by looking at fiction, film, and foodways from the last 30 years of Black-Asian relations in America. Using a comparative race and ethnic studies approach, we identify ways of thinking and talking about interracial difference that forge new paths for social, cultural, and political engagement.

Instructors
Kinohi Nishikawa
Spring 2020
AACL
Princeton Atelier: Visualizing the Battle Cry (LA)
Subject associations
ATL 497 / AAS 497 / VIS 497

Inspired by the experience of Black Civil War soldiers, the visual aesthetics of 19th century posters, and contemporary hip hop, the award-winning writer and historian Imani Perry and the visual artist Mario Moore will collaborate on a groundbreaking new project. Using hip hop to reimagine the soundscape of battle in the mid-1800s, Moore and Perry will negotiate both the historical record and the idea of what might have been. Students will work alongside Moore and Perry in drawing on language, visual prints and audio to make connections between the 19th century and our own revolutionary moment.

Instructors
Mario Moore
Imani Perry
Spring 2021
AACL
Rhetoric, A User's Guide (From Ancient Greece to the American Present) (CD or LA)
Subject associations
CHV 247 / CLA 257 / AAS 246 / HLS 247

This course will explore the theory and practice of rhetoric in ancient Greece and Rome and the ways in which classical rhetoric has been adapted in modern American verbal art. From Gorgias and Demosthenes to Lincoln and Douglass, to Ida B. Wells and Fannie Lou Hamer, we will consider what makes individual speeches noteworthy in their local, historical contexts, as well as placing them in a larger rhetorical tradition. Throughout, we will analyze the role of ideologies of gender, class, race, nationality, religion, and sexuality in the construction of the rhetorical subject.

Instructors
Emily Greenwood
Spring 2022
AACL
The Hidden History of Hollywood - Research Film Studio (CD or LA)
Subject associations
CHV 385 / AAS 385

This course uncovers the roots of racial injustice in Hollywood; the secret, but cardinal role Woodrow Wilson played in the production and distribution of D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation that led directly to the rebirth of the KKK and increased violence against Afro-Americans; and William Monroe Trotter's fight against the propaganda film. Wilson's policy of segregation was adapted by Hollywood as a self-censoring industry regulation of representation. Black people could only appear on screen as subservient and marginal characters, never as equals, partners or leaders. This code, Wilson's legacy, has become second nature to Hollywood.

Instructors
Erika A. Kiss
Spring 2021
The Hidden History of Hollywood - Research Film Studio (CD or LA)
Subject associations
CHV 385 / AAS 385 / VIS 385

This course surveys a hidden canon of African American film and also uncovers the roots of representational injustice in Hollywood and the secret, but cardinal role Woodrow Wilson played in the production and distribution of Griffith's "The Birth of a Nation" that led to the rebirth of the KKK. Wilson's policy of segregation was adapted by Hollywood as a self-censoring industry regulation of representation. Black people could only appear on screen as subservient and marginal characters, never as equals, partners or leaders. This industry code, Wilson's legacy, has become second nature to Hollywood.

Instructors
Erika A. Kiss
Fall 2022
GRE
Bondage and Slaving in Global History (HA)
Subject associations
CLA 225 / MED 225 / AAS 263 / HLS 225

Ranging from the Neolithic to the 21st century, this course will survey the history of human bondage. Topics to be explored include the role of slavery in the rise of the first Neolithic states; the institutionalization of slavery in ancient Mesopotamia, the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, and ancient China; the proliferation of slave systems elsewhere in Eurasia and on the African continent; the economic and political transformation of the Old and New Worlds through the commodification of African and Native American bodies; and the feedback loops linking ancient slave systems to modern ones.

Instructors
Dan-El Padilla Peralta
Spring 2018
AACL
GRE
Citizenships Ancient and Modern (SA)
Subject associations
CLA 310 / CHV 314 / AAS 311 / POL 310

Recent developments in the United States and throughout the world have exposed fault lines in how communities design and regulate forms of citizenship. But current debates over the assignment, withholding, or deprivation of citizen status have a long and violent history. In this course we will attempt to map a history of citizenship from the ancient Mediterranean world to the 21st century. Questions to be tackled include: who/what is a citizen? (How) are exclusion and marginalization wired into the historical legacies and present-day practices of citizenship?

Instructors
Dan-El Padilla Peralta
Fall 2020
RPP
Race and the Inhumanities (CD or HA)
Subject associations
CLA 342 / HUM 348 / AAS 356

Few technologies of domination have been wielded with more sweeping and devastating global consequence than race. The research and teaching taxonomies of predominantly White institutions such as Princeton bear witness both to this history and to the intricacy of those mechanisms that work to conceal it. Taking our cue from Achille Mbembe - "racial thinking... has been the ever-present shadow hovering over Western political thought and practice" - we'll examine the role of race and racialization in the formation of the intellectual disciplines around which universities like ours are organized, with a particular emphasis on the humanities.

Instructors
Tom Davies
Dan-El Padilla Peralta
Spring 2021
GRE
Introduction to African Literature and Film (CD or LA)
Subject associations
COM 239 / AFS 239 / AAS 239 / HUM 239

African literature and films have been a vital (but often unacknowledged) stream in and stimulant to the global traffic in invention. Nigerian literature is one of the great literatures of the twentieth century. Ethiopian literature is one of the oldest literatures in the world. Senegalese films include some of the finest films ever made. In this course, we will study the richness and diversity of foundational African texts (some in translation), while foregrounding questions of aesthetics, style, humor, epistemology.

Instructors
Wendy Laura Belcher
Fall 2020
GRE
The Golden Rhinoceros: Histories of the African Middle Ages (LA)
Subject associations
COM 241 / AAS 241 / AFS 241

Many assume that pre-twentieth-century Africa has no history. Rather, it has so much history that communicating all its richness can be a challenge. In this class, therefore, we focus on particular instances that speak to the tremendous diversity of the period from 300 to 1500 in Africa - its political systems, religious communities, and dynamics of cultural and economic conversation. We also address Africa's interconnectedness within and to the rest of the world as a vital part of the global middle ages. Primary sources include letters, treatises, and chronicles but also maps, archeological layouts, frescos, inscriptions, and rock art.

Instructors
Wendy Laura Belcher
Francois-Xavier Fauvelle
Spring 2020
AACL
Cinema in Times of Pandemic: Research Film Studio (EM)
Subject associations
COM 373 / AAS 383 / AMS 388

In cooperation with the Sundance and the Berlin Film Festivals, our workshop will investigate the crisis of film production, distribution and canonization made acute by the Pandemic as well as divisive culture wars. We will uncover how the formation of film canons is informed by the ebb and flow of the civil rights movement. Our focus will be on stories of injustice filmed by women and Afro-American artists. The seminar work will consist of making short digital presentations and scholarly film-montage essays. The class will record Zoom interviews with critically acclaimed filmmakers, film festival directors and leaders of the film industry.

Instructors
Erika A. Kiss
Spring 2021
GRE
Crafting Freedom: Women and Liberation in the Americas (1960s to the present) (CD or LA)
Subject associations
COM 376 / AAS 371 / GSS 439 / LAS 376

This course explores questions and practices of liberation in writings by women philosophers and poets whose work helped to create cultural and political movements in the U.S. and Latin America. Starting in the 60s, we will study a poetics and politics of liberation, paying special attention to the role played by language and imagination when ideas translate onto social movements related to social justice, structural violence, education, care, and the commons. Readings include Gloria Anzaldúa, Angela Davis, Silvia Federici, Diamela Eltit, Audre Lorde, Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui, Gayatri Spivak, Zapatistas, among others.

Instructors
Susana Draper
Fall 2021
GRE
Gender and Sexuality in African History (LA)
Subject associations
COM 434 / AAS 434 / AFS 435 / GSS 434

This course explores the history of gender and sexuality in Africa. By reading an eclectic range of historical sources (including films, novels, and anthropological works) alongside recent secondary literature, students will explore several important questions. How have African cultures, religions, experiences of colonialism, political formations, medicines, and youth, shaped, and been shaped by, understandings of gender and sexuality? What link is there between contemporary LGBTQ activism and African history? Why do debates about Africa often center on issues of gender and sexuality? Is "queer" a meaningful method for African studies?

Instructors
Wendy Laura Belcher
Ray Thornton
Spring 2020
GRE
Crafting Freedom: Women and Liberation in the Americas (1960s to the present) (CD or LA)
Subject associations
COM 476 / AAS 476 / GSS 476 / LAS 476

This course explores questions and practices of liberation in writings by women philosophers and poets whose work helped to create cultural and political movements in the U.S. and Latin America. Starting in the 60s, we will study a poetics and politics of liberation, paying special attention to the role played by language and imagination when ideas translate onto social movements related to social justice, structural violence, education, care, and the commons. Readings include Gloria Anzaldúa, Angela Davis, Silvia Federici, Diamela Eltit, Audre Lorde, Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui, Gayatri Spivak, Zapatistas, among others.

Instructors
Susana Draper
Spring 2022
AACL
Special Topics in Poetry: Race, Identity and Innovation (LA)
Subject associations
CWR 316 / AAS 336 / LAO 316 / ASA 316

This workshop explores the link between racial identity and poetic innovation in work by contemporary poets of color. Experimental or avant-garde poetry in the American literary tradition has often defined itself as "impersonal," "against expression" or "post-identity." Unfortunately, this mindset has tended to exclude or downplay poems that engage issues of racial identity. This course explores works where poets of color have treated racial identity as a means to destabilize literary ideals of beauty, mastery and the autonomy of the text while at the same time engaging in poetic practices that subvert conceptions of identity or authenticity.

Instructors
Monica Y. Youn
Fall 2020
AACL
GRE
The American Experience and Dance Practices of the African Diaspora (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 211 / AAS 211

A studio course introducing students to American dance aesthetics and practices, with a focus on how its evolution has been influenced by African American choreographers and dancers. An ongoing study of movement practices from traditional African dances and those of the African Diaspora, touching on American jazz dance, modern dance, and American ballet. Studio work will be complemented by readings, video viewings, guest speakers, and dance studies.

Instructors
Dyane Harvey Salaam
Spring 2022
The American Experience and Dance Practices of the African Diaspora (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 211 / AAS 211

A studio course introducing students to African dance practices and aesthetics, with a focus on how its evolution has influenced American and African American culture, choreographers and dancers. An ongoing study of movement practices from traditional African dances and those of the African Diaspora, touching on American jazz dance, modern dance, and American ballet. Studio work will be complemented by readings, video viewings, guest speakers, and dance studies.

Instructors
Dyane Harvey Salaam
Fall 2022
Introduction to Dance Across Cultures (CD or SA)
Subject associations
DAN 215 / ANT 355 / GSS 215 / AMS 215

Bharatanatyam, butoh, hip hop, and salsa are some of the dances that will have us travel from temples and courtyards to clubs, streets, and stages around the world. Through studio sessions, readings and viewings, field research, and discussions, this seminar will introduce students to dance across cultures with special attention to issues of migration, cultural appropriation, gender and sexuality, and spiritual and religious expression. Students will also learn basic elements of participant observation research. Guest artists will teach different dance forms. No prior dance experience is necessary.

Instructors
Judith Hamera
Fall 2020
AACL
Introduction to Hip-Hop Dance (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 222 / AAS 222

This introductory survey course gives equal weight to scholarly study and embodied practice, using both approaches to explore a range of hip-hop dance techniques, as well as the cultural and historical contexts from which these dances emerged. Special attention will be given to breaking - the most prominent hip-hop form - as a foundation for exploring other forms of movement. By critically exploring these physical and historical connections, individuals will adapt and apply their own philosophies to dance in order to develop a personalized style.

Instructors
Joseph Schloss
Spring 2021
AACL
An Introduction to the Radical Imagination (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 223 / AAS 223 / VIS 224

Using an interdisciplinary visual and performance studies approach to explore various sites of contemporary art practices, this course will provide an introduction to radical performance practices through which artists consider the gendered and racialized body that circulates in the public domain, both onstage and off. We will query the kinds of political questions that performers raise with their work. Our texts will include live and recorded performances, as well as historical and theoretical secondary sources. Every other week the class hosts a public performance/speaking series featuring radical artists and curators.

Instructors
Jaamil Olawale Kosoko
Fall 2018
AACL
Introduction to Rhythm Tap Dance: Past Legacies, Future Rhythms (LA)
Subject associations
DAN 229 / MTD 229 / THR 229

In this studio course, dancers will study the past, present, and future of rhythm tap dance by learning the techniques and Black American histories, traditions, and legacies that have established and continue to sustain the form. While learning fundamental steps and foundational routines, we will interact with various media curated to introduce some of rhythm tap's important people, happenings, and places. Additionally, we will engage with related theory and closely examine the work of contemporary tap artists to identify how the form is being preserved and how Black traditions are being used to shape innovations and new approaches.

Instructors
Michael J. Love
Fall 2021
RPP
#Dancing Black: Black American Dance from 1970 to Today (CD or LA)
Subject associations
DAN 302 / AAS 316

This course explores the politics, aesthetics, and histories of Black American dance from the early 1970s to today. Paying special attention to the politics of circulation and new technologies, we will explore questions around innovation, virality, citation, ownership, and appropriation. Radio, television, YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok will be studied as connected yet discreet technologies of creative dispersal in direct relationship to their capacity for/constraints around creative, economic, and political output.

Instructors
Jasmine E. Johnson
Spring 2022