Life Finds A Way: Bodies, Futures, Embodied Futures

Professor Ruha Benjamin presented at Future Perfect, a conference sponsored by the New York City based research group, Data & Society.

Full conference summary.

Future Perfect resumed with a presentation by Ruha Benjamin, Assistant Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Benjamin used speculative ethnographic field notes to deliver her talk, entitled “Designer and discarded genomes: Experimenting with sociological imagination through speculative methods.” In order to “explore the antecedents and implications of the current era of genetic engineering,” Benjamin read a series of field notes from the Human Genome Project-Write initiative, a 2016 convening at Harvard for discussing the implications and logistics of producing synthetic human genomes. Benjamin subsequently read fictional field notes from 1816 and 2216 — 200 years into the past and future, respectively.

Benjamin drew attention to the changing standards of what constitutes “human life,” using her notes from 1816 to explore ideas of “humanity” as applied to enslaved peoples during the Middle Passage. Her 2216 notes explored speculative divisions between beings modified so that they no longer have to eat, and unmodified beings which still used food as an energy source. By doing so, Benjamin had the audience consider what part of “humanity” was discarded in the context of slavery. In the future, she asked, when we have the power to design “‘ideal’ genomes, what versions of humanity are discarded?” Benjamin concluded by observing that “fictions are not falsehoods, but re-fashionings.”

 

Women’s Intimacies in an Early African Text

This talk by Wendy Laura Belcher is a condensed version of her article, “Same-Sex Intimacies in the Early African Text the Gädlä Wälättä P̣eṭros (1672) about an Ethiopian Female Saint,” which will be published in the journal Research in African Literatures in 2016.

#blkstudiesdigitalage race, digital media, social networks

#BlkStudiesDigitalAge: Race, Digital Media & Social Networks

How might scholars, artists, and others working in, and inspired by, the black studies tradition respond to the interlocking opportunities and challenges presented by the digital revolution?

A panel discussion, featuring:
Ruha Benjamin, Assistant Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University
M. Neelika Jayawardane, Associate Professor of English at the State University of New York-Oswego, and senior editor and contributor to the online magazine, Africa is a Country

Renina Jarmon, PhD candidate in Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland  and author of “Black Girls Are From the Future”

Moderated by Joshua Guild

The Psychology of Racial Bias and Stereotyping

What does it mean to be a racist?

Take an implicit bias test to find out – even the most well-intentioned among us might be surprised at the results.

So where do our unconscious beliefs and biases toward other racial and ethnic groups come from and how can they be changed?

Professor Stacey Sinclair joined radio host Marty Moss-Coane on WHYY’s Radio Times to explore the questions above, and more. Jack Glaser of University of California-Berkeley also participates in the discussion.