Assistant Professor (On Sabbatical 17-18 AY)
Anna Arabindan-Kesson specializes in African American, Caribbean, and British art, with an emphasis on histories of race, empire, and transatlantic visual culture in the long 19th-century.
aa8@princeton.edu
(609) 258-8426
Associate Professor (On Sabbatical 17-18 AY)
Wendy Laura Belcher studies the intersection of diaspora, postcolonial, and 18th-century studies. She has a special interest in the literatures of Ethiopia and Ghana, and revealing ways in which African thought has animated British and European canonical literature.
wbelcher@princeton.edu
(609) 258-1683
Associate Professor & Faculty Advisor for Senior Colloquium
Ruha Benjamin specializes in the interdisciplinary study of science, medicine, and biotechnology; race-ethnicity and gender; health and biopolitics, and the sociology of knowledge.
ruha@princeton.edu
(609) 258-6936
Professor
Wallace Best specializes in 19th and 20th-century African American religious history with a research and teaching focus in areas related to religion and literature, Pentecostalism, and Womanist theology.
wbest@princeton.edu
(609) 258-6940
Chair (On Sabbatical 17-18 AY)
Eddie S. Glaude Jr. studies philosophy and literature, theorizing approaches towards addressing persistent inequality by devising critical frames (like the Value Gap) that elevate public discourse to a level he describes as "accessible seriousness." He is an expert in African American religious history and theology.
esglaude@princeton.edu
Assistant Professor
Reena Goldthree focuses on the history of modern Latin America and the Caribbean, democracy and social movements, and World War I.
rgoldthree@princeton.edu
Director of Graduate Affairs
Joshua Guild specializes in 20th-century African American social and cultural history, urban history, and the making of the modern African diaspora, with particular interests in migration, black internationalism, black popular music, and the black radical tradition.
jguild@princeton.edu
(609) 258-0553
Professor (On Sabbatical 17-18 AY)
Tera Hunter studies United States history, with specializations in southern 19th-century African American history, and intersections with gender and labor. She has a particular interest in histories of slavery, including narratives about marriage and obtaining freedom.
thunter@princeton.edu
(609) 258-8904
Director of Undergraduate Affairs
Naomi Murakawa studies the reproduction of racial inequality in 20th and 21st-century American politics, with specialization in crime policy and the carceral state.
murakawa@princeton.edu
(609) 258-6274
Assistant Professor
Kinohi Nishikawa studies African American literature and modern print culture with specializations in the material history and cultural reception of African American pulp fiction in the Post-Civil rights era. His major work-in-progress considers the important yet overlooked role of book design.
kinohin@princeton.edu
(609) 258-6494
Associate Professor
Chika Okeke-Agulu specializes in African and African diaspora art and visual cultures. He is a particularly interested in the history of modernism in Africa, and the intersection of art and politics in modern and contemporary art.
cokekeag@princeton.edu
(609) 258-7456
Acting Chair & Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies
Imani Perry studies race, gender and African American culture using the tools provided by various disciplines including: law, literary and cultural studies, and the social sciences.
Professor
Stacey Sinclair examines how interpersonal interactions translate culturally held prejudices into individual thoughts and action. Her major findings suggest people may unknowingly be drawn to social networks characterized by members sharing corresponding degrees of intergroup bias.
ssinclr@princeton.edu
(609) 258-9557
Assistant Professor
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor studies race and public policy with specialization in housing policy. She is also interested in social movements, rebellion, and American politics.
kytaylor@princeton.edu
Assistant Professor
Autumn Womack specializes in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century African American literature, with a particular research and teaching focus on the intersection of visual technology, race, and literary culture.
amwomack@princeton.edu