Democracy in Black Nominated for NAACP Image Award, Outstanding Literary Work (Nonfiction)

Eddie S. Glaude’s book Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul has been nominated for an NAACP Image Award! The NAACP Image Award is an accolade presented by the American National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to honor outstanding people of color in film, television, music, and literature. Voting is now open to NAACP members to determine the winners of the 48th NAACP Image Awards.

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Professor Chika Okeke-Agulu Awarded the African Studies Association Herskovits Prize

Professor Chika Okeke-Agulu won the African Studies Association Herskovits Prize for his book Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in 20th-Century Nigeria.  The Melville J. Herskovits Award is an annual award given by the African Studies Association to the best scholarly work (including translations) on Africa published in English in the previous year and distributed in the United States. This is the most prestigious prize in any discipline pertaining to African studies, with award winners going back to the 1960s.

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Aaron Robertson, AAS Certificate Student, Awarded Rhodes Scholarship

Princeton University senior Aaron Robertson has been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship for graduate study at the University of Oxford. He is among the 32 American recipients of the prestigious fellowships, which fund two to three years of graduate study at Oxford. Robertson, of Redford, Michigan, is concentrating in Italian (in the Department of French and Italian) and pursuing a certificate in African American Studies. At Oxford, he plans to pursue an M.Phil. in modern languages.

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Professor Imani Perry and Professor Taylor Contribute to #PrincetonU Series, ‘The Next Four Years’ on Race and Inequality in United States

The next president will have to face growing economic precarity for a large portion of the American public. In fact, many other pressing issues — immigration, race, policing and incarceration, and gender equity — are shaped in some significant measure by the fact that substantial swaths of our population live in actual or near poverty conditions and face downward mobility and persistent under-employment. Not only does it mean that the American Dream has grown even more elusive, it drives competition, racial animus and resentment, underground economies and deep anxieties about masculinity and traditional manhood ideals.

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Professor Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor’s Black Lives Matter Book Awarded Lannan Cultural Freedom Award

The Board of Directors of Lannan Foundation announces the winner of this year’s Cultural Freedom Especially Notable Book AwardFrom #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, written by Princeton University African American Studies professor and activist Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. In From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistent structural inequality, including mass incarceration, housing discrimination, police violence, and unemployment. She argues that the emerging struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader movement for Black liberation. The Haymarket Books Press publication is in its fourth printing. 

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Professor Chika Okeke-Agulu Wins the CAA Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism

Chika Okeke-Agulu, associate professor of art and archaeology and African American studies, has been awarded the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism from the College Art Association (CAA) for his book Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in 20th-Century Nigeria (Duke University Press, 2015). The award, given for significant published art criticism that has appeared in publication in a one-year period, is named in honor of art critic and scholar Mather, who came to Princeton in 1910 from Johns Hopkins University as the first Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology, and became the director of the Princeton University Art Museum in 1922. Okeke-Agulu accepted the award at the CAA annual convention on Feb. 3 in Washington, D.C.

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Professor Ruha Benjamin Delivers the Johns Hopkins Henrietta Lacks Memorial Lecture

The Johns Hopkins for Institutional and Clinical Research sponsor the Henrietta Lacks Memorial Lecture Series with the goal of honoring the positive and global impact of the HeLa cells. The series reminds all scientists and researchers to engage research participants with respect, gratitude and clear communication. Professor Ruha Benjamin served as a the sixth honored speaker to keynote the lecture series. Benjamin’s work, through papers and her book People’s Science, engage directly with the life and legacy of Henrietta Lacks, the HeLa cells, and her family and descendants. Benjamin’s talk puts forward an idea, and forewarns against, ‘discriminatory design’ — that is, processes that are conceived of to serve people, yet do not include diverse perspectives in their planning and incubation.

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PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CLIPS

Please note: We are taking Princeton’s winter recess to make improvements to the AAS21 archive of research and commentary. Function may be limited in January and into February; updates will be completed as early in the Spring semester as possible. Thank you for your patience!

January 10, 2017